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Written emotional disclosure for women with ovarian cancer and their partners: randomised controlled trial

Written emotional disclosure for women with ovarian cancer and their partners: randomised controlled trial
Written emotional disclosure for women with ovarian cancer and their partners: randomised controlled trial
Objective: written emotional disclosure for 15–20?min a day over 3 to 4?days improves physical and psychological health and may benefit cancer patients. However, no studies have tested the effectiveness of guided writing in cancer patients and their partners. A randomised controlled trial tested whether writing about the patient's diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer using the Guided Disclosure Protocol (GDP) is effective in reducing perceived stress and improving quality of life (QoL) in ovarian cancer couples. The study also tested two theories that may account for beneficial effects of written emotional disclosure, the cognitive processing hypothesis and the social interaction hypothesis.

Methods: patients and their partners (N?=?102 couples) were randomised to write at home for 15?min a day over 3?days about the patient's diagnosis and treatment using the GDP or what the patient did the previous day (control). Couples were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-month follow-ups on the primary outcomes of perceived stress and QoL and secondary outcomes of intrusive thoughts (testing the cognitive processing hypothesis) and illness-related couple communication (testing the social interaction hypothesis).

Results: there were no main effects for any outcomes. However, in patients, the GDP improved QoL if illness-related couple communication improved and buffered the effect of intrusive thoughts on perceived stress.

Conclusions: the GDP might benefit patients in certain circumstances, through changes in communication (in line with the social interaction hypothesis). Further research is needed to determine whether patients benefit from interventions to improve illness-related couple communication and under which conditions
Arden-Close, Emily
476eebfb-e256-474b-8351-09db1efdeab5
Gidron, Yori
56310d95-dcfd-4178-95f1-1b1049f4c1f7
Bayne, Louise
d509bbec-70fb-45b5-9868-9f4d2405f860
Moss-Morris, Rona
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e
Arden-Close, Emily
476eebfb-e256-474b-8351-09db1efdeab5
Gidron, Yori
56310d95-dcfd-4178-95f1-1b1049f4c1f7
Bayne, Louise
d509bbec-70fb-45b5-9868-9f4d2405f860
Moss-Morris, Rona
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e

Arden-Close, Emily, Gidron, Yori, Bayne, Louise and Moss-Morris, Rona (2013) Written emotional disclosure for women with ovarian cancer and their partners: randomised controlled trial. Psycho-Oncology. (doi:10.1002/pon.3280).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: written emotional disclosure for 15–20?min a day over 3 to 4?days improves physical and psychological health and may benefit cancer patients. However, no studies have tested the effectiveness of guided writing in cancer patients and their partners. A randomised controlled trial tested whether writing about the patient's diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer using the Guided Disclosure Protocol (GDP) is effective in reducing perceived stress and improving quality of life (QoL) in ovarian cancer couples. The study also tested two theories that may account for beneficial effects of written emotional disclosure, the cognitive processing hypothesis and the social interaction hypothesis.

Methods: patients and their partners (N?=?102 couples) were randomised to write at home for 15?min a day over 3?days about the patient's diagnosis and treatment using the GDP or what the patient did the previous day (control). Couples were assessed at baseline, 3- and 6-month follow-ups on the primary outcomes of perceived stress and QoL and secondary outcomes of intrusive thoughts (testing the cognitive processing hypothesis) and illness-related couple communication (testing the social interaction hypothesis).

Results: there were no main effects for any outcomes. However, in patients, the GDP improved QoL if illness-related couple communication improved and buffered the effect of intrusive thoughts on perceived stress.

Conclusions: the GDP might benefit patients in certain circumstances, through changes in communication (in line with the social interaction hypothesis). Further research is needed to determine whether patients benefit from interventions to improve illness-related couple communication and under which conditions

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e-pub ahead of print date: 15 March 2013

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 350712
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/350712
PURE UUID: 26271fee-dfbb-4408-82a2-31fa8bbab838

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2013 10:32
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:31

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Contributors

Author: Emily Arden-Close
Author: Yori Gidron
Author: Louise Bayne
Author: Rona Moss-Morris

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