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Kite dynamics for ship propulsion

Kite dynamics for ship propulsion
Kite dynamics for ship propulsion
Kite propulsion has emerged as an attractive means to harness wind power in a way that yields environmental and financial benefits. An understanding of the dynamics that affect kite motion and the resulting forces is required to facilitate the design and optimization of kite propulsion systems. In this thesis results from two line tension models are compared with experimentally recorded time histories for dynamic kite flight. New methodologies for investigating kite performance are established. The first zero mass model assumes that the kite and lines are weightless. The second, lumped mass model, considers the kites mass and thus makes use of the equations of motion.

It is found that the two different models converge to the same result in the limit where the kite mass tends to zero. The zero mass model has been shown to compare favourably with experimental results. A method for parameterising figure of eight shape kite trajectories and for predicting kite velocity is presented. Results are shown for a variety of manoeuvre shapes, assuming realistic performance characteristics from an experimental test kite. Using a 320m2 kite, with 300m long flying lines in 6.18ms.
Dadd, George M.
ea26a6f8-2f89-45f8-8e4f-1d6d32755be6
Dadd, George M.
ea26a6f8-2f89-45f8-8e4f-1d6d32755be6
Hudson, Dominic
3814e08b-1993-4e78-b5a4-2598c40af8e7

Dadd, George M. (2013) Kite dynamics for ship propulsion. University of Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Doctoral Thesis, 215pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Kite propulsion has emerged as an attractive means to harness wind power in a way that yields environmental and financial benefits. An understanding of the dynamics that affect kite motion and the resulting forces is required to facilitate the design and optimization of kite propulsion systems. In this thesis results from two line tension models are compared with experimentally recorded time histories for dynamic kite flight. New methodologies for investigating kite performance are established. The first zero mass model assumes that the kite and lines are weightless. The second, lumped mass model, considers the kites mass and thus makes use of the equations of motion.

It is found that the two different models converge to the same result in the limit where the kite mass tends to zero. The zero mass model has been shown to compare favourably with experimental results. A method for parameterising figure of eight shape kite trajectories and for predicting kite velocity is presented. Results are shown for a variety of manoeuvre shapes, assuming realistic performance characteristics from an experimental test kite. Using a 320m2 kite, with 300m long flying lines in 6.18ms.

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More information

Published date: 26 February 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, Engineering Science Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 351348
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/351348
PURE UUID: 129fe348-e574-438b-9c8e-4e0bd3f3f5ea
ORCID for Dominic Hudson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2012-6255

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2013 13:24
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:05

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Contributors

Author: George M. Dadd
Thesis advisor: Dominic Hudson ORCID iD

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