The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Letter. Self-assembled DNA nanopores that span lipid bilayers

Letter. Self-assembled DNA nanopores that span lipid bilayers
Letter. Self-assembled DNA nanopores that span lipid bilayers
DNA nanotechnology excels at rationally designing bottom-up structures that can functionally replicate naturally occurring proteins. Here we describe the design and generation of a stable DNA-based nanopore that structurally mimics the amphiphilic nature of protein pores and inserts into bilayers to support a steady transmembrane flow of ions. The pore carries an outer hydrophobic belt comprised of small chemical alkyl groups which mask the negatively charged oligonucleotide backbone. This modification overcomes the otherwise inherent energetic mismatch to the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. By merging the fields of nanopores and DNA nanotechnology, we expect that the small membrane-spanning DNA pore will help open up the design of entirely new molecular devices for a broad range of applications including sensing, electric circuits, catalysis, and research into nanofluidics and controlled transmembrane transport.
1530-6984
2351-2356
Burns, Jonathan R.
648a50f5-bcca-4989-8de3-60cc582b7ed9
Stulz, Eugen
9a6c04cf-32ca-442b-9281-bbf3d23c622d
Howorka, Stefan
6a57dc44-4116-404d-b2f3-9f15388a70a6
Burns, Jonathan R.
648a50f5-bcca-4989-8de3-60cc582b7ed9
Stulz, Eugen
9a6c04cf-32ca-442b-9281-bbf3d23c622d
Howorka, Stefan
6a57dc44-4116-404d-b2f3-9f15388a70a6

Burns, Jonathan R., Stulz, Eugen and Howorka, Stefan (2013) Letter. Self-assembled DNA nanopores that span lipid bilayers. Nano Letters, 13 (6), 2351-2356. (doi:10.1021/nl304147f).

Record type: Article

Abstract

DNA nanotechnology excels at rationally designing bottom-up structures that can functionally replicate naturally occurring proteins. Here we describe the design and generation of a stable DNA-based nanopore that structurally mimics the amphiphilic nature of protein pores and inserts into bilayers to support a steady transmembrane flow of ions. The pore carries an outer hydrophobic belt comprised of small chemical alkyl groups which mask the negatively charged oligonucleotide backbone. This modification overcomes the otherwise inherent energetic mismatch to the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. By merging the fields of nanopores and DNA nanotechnology, we expect that the small membrane-spanning DNA pore will help open up the design of entirely new molecular devices for a broad range of applications including sensing, electric circuits, catalysis, and research into nanofluidics and controlled transmembrane transport.

PDF
showGalleyPdf.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Published date: 24 April 2013
Organisations: Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 352145
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/352145
ISSN: 1530-6984
PURE UUID: b7b3a6b1-0c6d-4c19-83b5-dc15db9e87a2
ORCID for Eugen Stulz: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5302-2276

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 May 2013 11:08
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:40

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×