The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Using ACT-R to Model Collective Sensemaking in Military Coalition Environments

Using ACT-R to Model Collective Sensemaking in Military Coalition Environments
Using ACT-R to Model Collective Sensemaking in Military Coalition Environments
Cognitive social simulations, enabled by cognitive architectures (such as ACT-R), are particularly well-suited for advancing our understanding of socially-distributed and socially-situated cognition. As a result, multi-agent simulations featuring the use of ACT-R agents may be important in improving our understanding of the factors that influence collective sensemaking. While previous studies demonstrate the feasibility of using ACT-R to model collective cognition, as well as sensemaking processes at the individual level, the development of an ACT-R model of collective sensemaking in a coalition environment presents a range of relatively novel methodological, technological and modeling challenges. Such challenges include the need to equip ACT-R agents with communication capabilities, the need to deal with highly dynamic information environments, the need to support intelligent information retrieval capabilities, and the need to represent inter-agent cognitive differences. These challenges shape the nature of research and development efforts to create a multi-agent simulation capability that can be used to explore the impact of different sociotechnical interventions on collective sensemaking processes. In this paper, we discuss the research efforts being undertaken to address these challenges in the context of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) research program. We also discuss the motivations for using ACT-R to model collective sensemaking processes and outline some opportunities for model application and empirical evaluation.
sensemaking, distributed cognition, social influence, network science, collective sensemaking, team sensemaking, social information processing, cognitive architecture, ACT-R, collective cognition, military coalitions
Richardson, Darren P.
f55f06e8-4f92-4399-b365-558b4e64d65d
Smart, Paul R
cd8a3dbf-d963-4009-80fb-76ecc93579df
Sycara, Katia
df200c43-d34d-4093-bb4e-493fea2d0732
Stone, Paul
24354822-ffa9-4843-9c8c-9b4a1ea7e571
Giammanco, Cheryl
5b2c8827-0000-4cae-ae67-96ac545e40d0
Powell, Gavin
d5ac622b-446b-474e-a968-98eb1b4d30ab
Richardson, Darren P.
f55f06e8-4f92-4399-b365-558b4e64d65d
Smart, Paul R
cd8a3dbf-d963-4009-80fb-76ecc93579df
Sycara, Katia
df200c43-d34d-4093-bb4e-493fea2d0732
Stone, Paul
24354822-ffa9-4843-9c8c-9b4a1ea7e571
Giammanco, Cheryl
5b2c8827-0000-4cae-ae67-96ac545e40d0
Powell, Gavin
d5ac622b-446b-474e-a968-98eb1b4d30ab

Richardson, Darren P., Smart, Paul R, Sycara, Katia, Stone, Paul, Giammanco, Cheryl and Powell, Gavin (2013) Using ACT-R to Model Collective Sensemaking in Military Coalition Environments. Annual Fall Meeting of the International Technology Alliance, Palisades, New York, United States. 8 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Cognitive social simulations, enabled by cognitive architectures (such as ACT-R), are particularly well-suited for advancing our understanding of socially-distributed and socially-situated cognition. As a result, multi-agent simulations featuring the use of ACT-R agents may be important in improving our understanding of the factors that influence collective sensemaking. While previous studies demonstrate the feasibility of using ACT-R to model collective cognition, as well as sensemaking processes at the individual level, the development of an ACT-R model of collective sensemaking in a coalition environment presents a range of relatively novel methodological, technological and modeling challenges. Such challenges include the need to equip ACT-R agents with communication capabilities, the need to deal with highly dynamic information environments, the need to support intelligent information retrieval capabilities, and the need to represent inter-agent cognitive differences. These challenges shape the nature of research and development efforts to create a multi-agent simulation capability that can be used to explore the impact of different sociotechnical interventions on collective sensemaking processes. In this paper, we discuss the research efforts being undertaken to address these challenges in the context of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) research program. We also discuss the motivations for using ACT-R to model collective sensemaking processes and outline some opportunities for model application and empirical evaluation.

Text
ITAAFM2013.pdf - Other
Download (194kB)

More information

Published date: 25 August 2013
Venue - Dates: Annual Fall Meeting of the International Technology Alliance, Palisades, New York, United States, 2013-08-24
Keywords: sensemaking, distributed cognition, social influence, network science, collective sensemaking, team sensemaking, social information processing, cognitive architecture, ACT-R, collective cognition, military coalitions
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 356115
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356115
PURE UUID: 845e59ca-ecdf-4084-b113-98ac0fba90ea
ORCID for Paul R Smart: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9989-5307

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Aug 2013 22:05
Last modified: 09 Jul 2020 00:28

Export record

Contributors

Author: Darren P. Richardson
Author: Paul R Smart ORCID iD
Author: Katia Sycara
Author: Paul Stone
Author: Cheryl Giammanco
Author: Gavin Powell

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×