The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Adaptive feedback analysis and control of programmable stimuli for assessment of cerebrovascular function

Adaptive feedback analysis and control of programmable stimuli for assessment of cerebrovascular function
Adaptive feedback analysis and control of programmable stimuli for assessment of cerebrovascular function
The assessment of cerebrovascular regulatory mechanisms often requires flexibly controlled and precisely timed changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and/or inspired CO2. In this study, a new system for inducing variations in mean ABP was designed, implemented and tested using programmable sequences and programmable controls to induce pressure changes through bilateral thigh cuffs. The system is also integrated with a computer-controlled switch to select air or a CO2/air mixture to be provided via a face mask. Adaptive feedback control of a pressure generator was required to meet stringent specifications for fast changes, and accuracy in timing and pressure levels applied by the thigh cuffs. The implemented system consists of a PC-based signal analysis/control unit, a pressure control unit and a CO2/air control unit. Initial evaluations were carried out to compare the cuff pressure control performances between adaptive and non-adaptive control configurations. Results show that the adaptive control method can reduce the mean error in sustaining target pressure by 99.57 % and reduce the transient time in pressure increases by 45.21 %. The system has proven a highly effective tool in ongoing research on brain blood flow control.
Blood Pressure, Carbon Dioxide, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Equipment Design, Feedback, Homeostasis, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Thigh, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
0140-0118
709-718
Fan, Lingke
29024168-8284-4e9b-86e5-685e846e92ac
Bush, Glen
ebda29ff-992f-4910-b82a-03a22c4cc66c
Katsogridakis, Emmanuel
863d80d0-d656-453d-98fe-70f2c16aaaf9
Simpson, David M
53674880-f381-4cc9-8505-6a97eeac3c2a
Allen, Robert
956a918f-278c-48ef-8e19-65aa463f199a
Potter, John
fab3e3b2-70bf-4116-a7dd-3a3731b2f134
Birch, Anthony A
755f2236-4c0c-49b5-9884-de4021acd42d
Panerai, Ronney B
7acaf714-a17c-4df2-a1f3-b148c1445517
Fan, Lingke
29024168-8284-4e9b-86e5-685e846e92ac
Bush, Glen
ebda29ff-992f-4910-b82a-03a22c4cc66c
Katsogridakis, Emmanuel
863d80d0-d656-453d-98fe-70f2c16aaaf9
Simpson, David M
53674880-f381-4cc9-8505-6a97eeac3c2a
Allen, Robert
956a918f-278c-48ef-8e19-65aa463f199a
Potter, John
fab3e3b2-70bf-4116-a7dd-3a3731b2f134
Birch, Anthony A
755f2236-4c0c-49b5-9884-de4021acd42d
Panerai, Ronney B
7acaf714-a17c-4df2-a1f3-b148c1445517

Fan, Lingke, Bush, Glen, Katsogridakis, Emmanuel, Simpson, David M, Allen, Robert, Potter, John, Birch, Anthony A and Panerai, Ronney B (2013) Adaptive feedback analysis and control of programmable stimuli for assessment of cerebrovascular function. Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, 51 (6), 709-718. (doi:10.1007/s11517-013-1040-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The assessment of cerebrovascular regulatory mechanisms often requires flexibly controlled and precisely timed changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and/or inspired CO2. In this study, a new system for inducing variations in mean ABP was designed, implemented and tested using programmable sequences and programmable controls to induce pressure changes through bilateral thigh cuffs. The system is also integrated with a computer-controlled switch to select air or a CO2/air mixture to be provided via a face mask. Adaptive feedback control of a pressure generator was required to meet stringent specifications for fast changes, and accuracy in timing and pressure levels applied by the thigh cuffs. The implemented system consists of a PC-based signal analysis/control unit, a pressure control unit and a CO2/air control unit. Initial evaluations were carried out to compare the cuff pressure control performances between adaptive and non-adaptive control configurations. Results show that the adaptive control method can reduce the mean error in sustaining target pressure by 99.57 % and reduce the transient time in pressure increases by 45.21 %. The system has proven a highly effective tool in ongoing research on brain blood flow control.

Text
Manuscript for MedBioEngComput_V10.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (402kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 February 2013
Published date: June 2013
Keywords: Blood Pressure, Carbon Dioxide, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Equipment Design, Feedback, Homeostasis, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Thigh, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Organisations: Signal Processing & Control Grp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 361386
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/361386
ISSN: 0140-0118
PURE UUID: 079d0ce9-89de-4e29-9bb7-0317ba7d9822
ORCID for Anthony A Birch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2328-702X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jan 2014 12:15
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:23

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Lingke Fan
Author: Glen Bush
Author: Emmanuel Katsogridakis
Author: David M Simpson
Author: Robert Allen
Author: John Potter
Author: Anthony A Birch ORCID iD
Author: Ronney B Panerai

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×