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Patients' valuation of the prescribing nurse in primary care: a discrete choice experiment

Patients' valuation of the prescribing nurse in primary care: a discrete choice experiment
Patients' valuation of the prescribing nurse in primary care: a discrete choice experiment
Background: recently, primary care in the United Kingdom has undergone substantial changes in skill mix. Non-medical prescribing was introduced to improve patient access to medicines, make better use of different health practitioners' skills and increase patient choice. There is little evidence about value-based patient preferences for ‘prescribing nurse’ in a general practice setting.

Objective: to quantify value-based patient preferences for the profession of prescriber and other factors that influence choice of consultation for managing a minor illness.

Design: discrete choice experiment patient survey.

Setting and participants: five general practices in England with non-medical prescribing services, questionnaires completed by 451 patients.

Main outcome measure: stated choice of consultation.

Main results: there was a strong general preference for consulting ‘own doctor’ for minor illness. However, a consultation with a nurse prescriber with positive patient-focused attributes can be more acceptable to patients than a consultation provided by a doctor. Attributes ‘professional's attention to Patients' views’ and extent of ‘help offered’ were pivotal. Past experience influenced preference.

Discussion and conclusion: respondents demonstrated valid preferences. Preferences for consulting a doctor remained strong, but many were happy to consult with a nurse if other aspects of the consultation were improved. Findings show who to consult is not the only valued factor in choice of consultation for minor illness. The ‘prescribing nurse’ role has potential to offer consultation styles that patients value. Within the study's limitations, these findings can inform delivery of primary care to enhance patient experience and substitute appropriate nurse prescribing consultations for medical prescribing consultations.
1369-6513
2223-2235
Gerard, Karen
1aef0321-add2-425f-8cd6-48f1adeef928
Tinelli, Michela
2e4c3281-1836-475d-be90-c31d9020bd53
Latter, Sue
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Smith, Alesha
74a74fec-39f8-49d3-82e0-4de469dc1c6d
Blenkinsopp, Alison
12c72c8c-3d75-432f-9097-4776af11b5d1
Gerard, Karen
1aef0321-add2-425f-8cd6-48f1adeef928
Tinelli, Michela
2e4c3281-1836-475d-be90-c31d9020bd53
Latter, Sue
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Smith, Alesha
74a74fec-39f8-49d3-82e0-4de469dc1c6d
Blenkinsopp, Alison
12c72c8c-3d75-432f-9097-4776af11b5d1

Gerard, Karen, Tinelli, Michela, Latter, Sue, Smith, Alesha and Blenkinsopp, Alison (2015) Patients' valuation of the prescribing nurse in primary care: a discrete choice experiment. Health Expectations, 18 (6), 2223-2235. (doi:10.1111/hex.12193).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: recently, primary care in the United Kingdom has undergone substantial changes in skill mix. Non-medical prescribing was introduced to improve patient access to medicines, make better use of different health practitioners' skills and increase patient choice. There is little evidence about value-based patient preferences for ‘prescribing nurse’ in a general practice setting.

Objective: to quantify value-based patient preferences for the profession of prescriber and other factors that influence choice of consultation for managing a minor illness.

Design: discrete choice experiment patient survey.

Setting and participants: five general practices in England with non-medical prescribing services, questionnaires completed by 451 patients.

Main outcome measure: stated choice of consultation.

Main results: there was a strong general preference for consulting ‘own doctor’ for minor illness. However, a consultation with a nurse prescriber with positive patient-focused attributes can be more acceptable to patients than a consultation provided by a doctor. Attributes ‘professional's attention to Patients' views’ and extent of ‘help offered’ were pivotal. Past experience influenced preference.

Discussion and conclusion: respondents demonstrated valid preferences. Preferences for consulting a doctor remained strong, but many were happy to consult with a nurse if other aspects of the consultation were improved. Findings show who to consult is not the only valued factor in choice of consultation for minor illness. The ‘prescribing nurse’ role has potential to offer consultation styles that patients value. Within the study's limitations, these findings can inform delivery of primary care to enhance patient experience and substitute appropriate nurse prescribing consultations for medical prescribing consultations.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 March 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 April 2014
Published date: December 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 364794
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/364794
ISSN: 1369-6513
PURE UUID: fab5fffb-6b27-4444-a787-4753cde889d6
ORCID for Sue Latter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0973-0512

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 May 2014 13:06
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 02:49

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Contributors

Author: Karen Gerard
Author: Michela Tinelli
Author: Sue Latter ORCID iD
Author: Alesha Smith
Author: Alison Blenkinsopp

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