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Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces
Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces
Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects.
1932-1058
Mishra, Puja
eeb1053e-e516-4cfe-bd5e-2fa6bdff7355
Hill, Martyn
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Glynne-Jones, P.
6ca3fcbc-14db-4af9-83e2-cf7c8b91ef0d
Mishra, Puja
eeb1053e-e516-4cfe-bd5e-2fa6bdff7355
Hill, Martyn
0cda65c8-a70f-476f-b126-d2c4460a253e
Glynne-Jones, P.
6ca3fcbc-14db-4af9-83e2-cf7c8b91ef0d

Mishra, Puja, Hill, Martyn and Glynne-Jones, P. (2014) Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces. Biomicrofluidics, 8 (34109). (doi:10.1063/1.4882777).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 9 June 2014
Published date: 9 June 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365598
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365598
ISSN: 1932-1058
PURE UUID: 575db159-feb6-4f3f-be80-629e0b0e66f5
ORCID for Martyn Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6448-9448
ORCID for P. Glynne-Jones: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5684-3953

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jun 2014 14:14
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

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