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Participation in voluntary and community organisations in the United Kingdom and the influences on the self-management of long-term conditions

Participation in voluntary and community organisations in the United Kingdom and the influences on the self-management of long-term conditions
Participation in voluntary and community organisations in the United Kingdom and the influences on the self-management of long-term conditions
Voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) have health benefits for those who attend and are viewed as having the potential to support long‐term condition management. However, existing community‐level understandings of participation do not explain the involvement with VCOs at an individual level, or the nature of support, which may elicit health benefits. Framing active participation as ‘doing and experiencing’, the aim of this qualitative study was to explore why people with long‐term vascular conditions join VCOs, maintain their membership and what prevents participation. Twenty participants, self‐diagnosed as having diabetes, chronic heart disease or chronic kidney disease, were purposefully sampled and recruited from a range of VCOs in the North West of England identified from a mapping of local organisations. In semi‐structured interviews, we explored the nature of their participation. Analysis was thematic and iterative involving a continual reflection on the data. People gave various reasons for joining groups. These included health and well‐being, the need for social contact and pursuing a particular hobby. Barriers to participation included temporal and spatial barriers and those associated with group dynamics. Members maintained their membership on the basis of an identity and sense of belonging to the group, developing close relationships within it and the availability of support and trust. Participants joined community groups often in response to a health‐related event. Our findings demonstrate the ways in which the social contact associated with continued participation in VCOs is seen as helping with long‐term condition management. Interventions designed at improving chronic illness management might usefully consider the role of VCOs.
0966-0410
252-261
Jeffries, M.
ae1aced3-0323-4b35-b6f4-c5ff33bddf83
Mathieson, A.
04a7122e-41d3-44c3-96e1-839bca3187a9
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Kirk, S..
e0fff506-42d3-4a93-a2a9-f04d793a254a
Morris, R.
b7cbbd1c-ba42-4140-aa43-140fc0f1d162
Blickem, C.
f730f7e2-20a5-4746-af02-1392ed2cbc63
Vassilev, I.
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Jeffries, M.
ae1aced3-0323-4b35-b6f4-c5ff33bddf83
Mathieson, A.
04a7122e-41d3-44c3-96e1-839bca3187a9
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Kirk, S..
e0fff506-42d3-4a93-a2a9-f04d793a254a
Morris, R.
b7cbbd1c-ba42-4140-aa43-140fc0f1d162
Blickem, C.
f730f7e2-20a5-4746-af02-1392ed2cbc63
Vassilev, I.
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7

Jeffries, M., Mathieson, A., Kennedy, Anne, Kirk, S.., Morris, R., Blickem, C., Vassilev, I. and Rogers, Anne (2015) Participation in voluntary and community organisations in the United Kingdom and the influences on the self-management of long-term conditions. Health & Social Care in the Community, 23 (3), 252-261. (doi:10.1111/hsc.12138).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) have health benefits for those who attend and are viewed as having the potential to support long‐term condition management. However, existing community‐level understandings of participation do not explain the involvement with VCOs at an individual level, or the nature of support, which may elicit health benefits. Framing active participation as ‘doing and experiencing’, the aim of this qualitative study was to explore why people with long‐term vascular conditions join VCOs, maintain their membership and what prevents participation. Twenty participants, self‐diagnosed as having diabetes, chronic heart disease or chronic kidney disease, were purposefully sampled and recruited from a range of VCOs in the North West of England identified from a mapping of local organisations. In semi‐structured interviews, we explored the nature of their participation. Analysis was thematic and iterative involving a continual reflection on the data. People gave various reasons for joining groups. These included health and well‐being, the need for social contact and pursuing a particular hobby. Barriers to participation included temporal and spatial barriers and those associated with group dynamics. Members maintained their membership on the basis of an identity and sense of belonging to the group, developing close relationships within it and the availability of support and trust. Participants joined community groups often in response to a health‐related event. Our findings demonstrate the ways in which the social contact associated with continued participation in VCOs is seen as helping with long‐term condition management. Interventions designed at improving chronic illness management might usefully consider the role of VCOs.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 1 September 2014
Published date: 1 May 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 365920
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/365920
ISSN: 0966-0410
PURE UUID: 38d2f546-bc62-4ec3-8800-17234960464f
ORCID for Anne Kennedy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4570-9104

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Date deposited: 24 Jun 2014 09:19
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:38

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