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Exposure to heavy physical occupational activities during working life and bone mineral density at the hip at retirement age

Exposure to heavy physical occupational activities during working life and bone mineral density at the hip at retirement age
Exposure to heavy physical occupational activities during working life and bone mineral density at the hip at retirement age
Background

People in sedentary occupations are at increased risk of hip fracture. Hip fracture is significantly associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) measured at the hip. Physical activity is important in the development and maintenance of BMD, but the effects of occupational physical activity on bone health are unclear. We investigated the influence of lifetime physical activity on BMD at the hip.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional epidemiological study of the associations between total hip BMD measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at retirement age and lifetime exposure to occupational physical workload (standing/walking ?4?h/day; lifting ?25?kg; energetic work sufficient to induce sweating and manual work).

Results

Complete data on occupational exposures were available for 860 adults (488 men and 372 women) who had worked ?20?years. Their mean age was 65?years, and many reported heavy physical workplace activities over prolonged durations. There were no statistically significant associations between total hip BMD and any of these measures of lifetime occupational physical activity in men or women.

Conclusions

Lifetime cumulative occupational activity was not associated with hip BMD at retirement age. Our findings suggest that, if sedentary work conveys an increased risk of hip fracture, it is unlikely that the mechanism is through reductions in BMD at the hip and may relate to other physical effects, such as falls risk. Further studies will be needed to test this hypothesis.
1351-0711
329-331
Walker-Bone, K.
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
D'Angelo, S.
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Syddall, H.E.
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Palmer, K.T.
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Cooper, C.
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Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Dennison, E.M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Walker-Bone, K.
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
D'Angelo, S.
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Syddall, H.E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Palmer, K.T.
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Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Coggon, D.
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Dennison, E.M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Walker-Bone, K., D'Angelo, S., Syddall, H.E., Palmer, K.T., Cooper, C., Coggon, D. and Dennison, E.M. (2014) Exposure to heavy physical occupational activities during working life and bone mineral density at the hip at retirement age. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 71 (5), 329-331. (doi:10.1136/oemed-2013-101967). (PMID:24619156)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

People in sedentary occupations are at increased risk of hip fracture. Hip fracture is significantly associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) measured at the hip. Physical activity is important in the development and maintenance of BMD, but the effects of occupational physical activity on bone health are unclear. We investigated the influence of lifetime physical activity on BMD at the hip.

Methods

This was a cross-sectional epidemiological study of the associations between total hip BMD measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at retirement age and lifetime exposure to occupational physical workload (standing/walking ?4?h/day; lifting ?25?kg; energetic work sufficient to induce sweating and manual work).

Results

Complete data on occupational exposures were available for 860 adults (488 men and 372 women) who had worked ?20?years. Their mean age was 65?years, and many reported heavy physical workplace activities over prolonged durations. There were no statistically significant associations between total hip BMD and any of these measures of lifetime occupational physical activity in men or women.

Conclusions

Lifetime cumulative occupational activity was not associated with hip BMD at retirement age. Our findings suggest that, if sedentary work conveys an increased risk of hip fracture, it is unlikely that the mechanism is through reductions in BMD at the hip and may relate to other physical effects, such as falls risk. Further studies will be needed to test this hypothesis.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 11 March 2014
Published date: 11 March 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 366411
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/366411
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: eaad8306-acc8-467e-b1e0-72d9257a48e2
ORCID for K. Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459
ORCID for S. D'Angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for H.E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987
ORCID for E.M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

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Date deposited: 01 Jul 2014 11:16
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:20

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Contributors

Author: K. Walker-Bone ORCID iD
Author: S. D'Angelo ORCID iD
Author: H.E. Syddall ORCID iD
Author: K.T. Palmer
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD
Author: E.M. Dennison ORCID iD

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