The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The role of mental health problems and common psychotropic drug treatments in accidental injury at work: a case-control study

The role of mental health problems and common psychotropic drug treatments in accidental injury at work: a case-control study
The role of mental health problems and common psychotropic drug treatments in accidental injury at work: a case-control study
Objectives Mental illness and psychotropic drugs have been linked with workplace injury, but few studies have measured exposures and outcomes independently or established their relative timings. To address this shortcoming, we conducted a case–control study nested within a database prospectively recording injury consultations, diagnoses and drug prescriptions.

Methods The Clinical Practice Research Datalink logs primary care data for 6% of the British population, coding all consultations (by the Read system) and drug prescriptions. We identified 1348 patients aged 16–64?years from this database who had consulted a family doctor or hospital over a 20-year period for workplace injury (cases, 479 diagnostic codes) and 6652 age, sex and practice-matched controls with no such consultation. Groups were compared in terms of consultations for mental health problems (1328 codes) and prescription of psychotropic drugs prior to the case's injury consultation using conditional logistic regression.

Results In total, 1846 (23%) subjects had at least one psychiatric consultation before the index date and 1682 (21%) had been prescribed a psychotropic drug. The OR for prior mental health consultation was 1.44 (p<0.001) and that for psychotropic drug treatment was 1.57 (p<0.001). Risks were significantly elevated for several subclasses of mental health diagnosis (eg, psychosis, neurosis) and for each of the drug classes analysed. Assuming causal relationships, about 9–10% of all workplace injuries leading to medical consultation were attributable to mental illness or psychotropic medication.

Conclusions Mental health problems and psychotropic treatments may account for an important minority of workplace injuries.

1351-0711
308-312
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
D'Angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Harris, E.C.
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Linaker, C.
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Palmer, K.T.
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
D'Angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Harris, E.C.
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Linaker, C.
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Palmer, K.T., D'Angelo, Stefania, Harris, E.C., Linaker, C. and Coggon, D. (2014) The role of mental health problems and common psychotropic drug treatments in accidental injury at work: a case-control study. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 308-312. (doi:10.1136/oemed-2013-101948). (PMID:24627304)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives Mental illness and psychotropic drugs have been linked with workplace injury, but few studies have measured exposures and outcomes independently or established their relative timings. To address this shortcoming, we conducted a case–control study nested within a database prospectively recording injury consultations, diagnoses and drug prescriptions.

Methods The Clinical Practice Research Datalink logs primary care data for 6% of the British population, coding all consultations (by the Read system) and drug prescriptions. We identified 1348 patients aged 16–64?years from this database who had consulted a family doctor or hospital over a 20-year period for workplace injury (cases, 479 diagnostic codes) and 6652 age, sex and practice-matched controls with no such consultation. Groups were compared in terms of consultations for mental health problems (1328 codes) and prescription of psychotropic drugs prior to the case's injury consultation using conditional logistic regression.

Results In total, 1846 (23%) subjects had at least one psychiatric consultation before the index date and 1682 (21%) had been prescribed a psychotropic drug. The OR for prior mental health consultation was 1.44 (p<0.001) and that for psychotropic drug treatment was 1.57 (p<0.001). Risks were significantly elevated for several subclasses of mental health diagnosis (eg, psychosis, neurosis) and for each of the drug classes analysed. Assuming causal relationships, about 9–10% of all workplace injuries leading to medical consultation were attributable to mental illness or psychotropic medication.

Conclusions Mental health problems and psychotropic treatments may account for an important minority of workplace injuries.

Text
Mental health paper FINAL R1 untracked.docx - Other
Download (62kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: March 2014
Published date: May 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 367017
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367017
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: 5f20f50f-539b-4289-814a-6610f897e6e5
ORCID for Stefania D'Angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for E.C. Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8037-566X
ORCID for C. Linaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1091-9283
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jul 2014 08:35
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:47

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: K.T. Palmer
Author: Stefania D'Angelo ORCID iD
Author: E.C. Harris ORCID iD
Author: C. Linaker ORCID iD
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×