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Association of early childhood abdominal circumference and weight gain with blood pressure at 36 months of age: secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study

Association of early childhood abdominal circumference and weight gain with blood pressure at 36 months of age: secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study
Association of early childhood abdominal circumference and weight gain with blood pressure at 36 months of age: secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study
Objectives To assess whether changes in measures of fat distribution and body size during early life are associated with blood pressure at 36?months of age.

Design Analysis of data collected from a prospective cohort study.

Setting Community-based investigation in Southampton, UK.

Participants 761 children with valid blood pressure measurements, born to women participating in the Southampton Women’s Survey.

Primary and secondary outcome measures Anthropometric measurements were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 36?months and conditional changes between the time points calculated. Blood pressure was measured at 36?months. Factors possibly influencing the blood pressure were assessed using linear regression. All independent variables of interest and confounding variables were included in stepwise multiple regression to identify the model that best predicted blood pressure at 36?months.

Results Greater conditional gains in abdominal circumference (AC) between 0–6 and 24–36?months were associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures at 36?months (p<0.001). Subscapular skinfold and height gains were weakly associated with higher blood pressures, while greater weight gains between 0–6, 12–24 and 24–36?months were more strongly associated, but the dominant influences were AC gains, particularly from 0–6 to 24–36?months. Thus one SD score increases in AC between 0–6 and 24–36?months were associated with 1.59?mm?Hg (95% CI 0.97 to 2.21) and 1.84?mm?Hg (1.24 to 2.46) higher systolic blood pressures, respectively, and 1.04?mm?Hg (0.57 to 1.51) and 1.02?mm?Hg (0.56, 1.48) higher diastolic pressures, respectively.

Conclusions Conditional gains in abdominal circumference, particularly within 6?months of birth and in the year preceding measurement, were more positively associated with blood pressure at 36?months than gains in other anthropometric measures. Above-average AC gains in early childhood may contribute to adult hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease risk.

0959-8138
e005412
Nowson, C.A.
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Crozier, S.R.
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Robinson, S.M.
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Godfrey, K.M.
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Lawrence, W.T.
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Law, C.M.
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Cooper, C.
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Inskip, H.M.
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Nowson, C.A.
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Crozier, S.R.
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Robinson, S.M.
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Godfrey, K.M.
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Lawrence, W.T.
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Law, C.M.
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Cooper, C.
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Inskip, H.M.
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Nowson, C.A., Crozier, S.R., Robinson, S.M., Godfrey, K.M., Lawrence, W.T., Law, C.M., Cooper, C. and Inskip, H.M. (2014) Association of early childhood abdominal circumference and weight gain with blood pressure at 36 months of age: secondary analysis of data from a prospective cohort study. British Medical Journal, 4 (7), e005412. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005412). (PMID:24993768)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives To assess whether changes in measures of fat distribution and body size during early life are associated with blood pressure at 36?months of age.

Design Analysis of data collected from a prospective cohort study.

Setting Community-based investigation in Southampton, UK.

Participants 761 children with valid blood pressure measurements, born to women participating in the Southampton Women’s Survey.

Primary and secondary outcome measures Anthropometric measurements were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 36?months and conditional changes between the time points calculated. Blood pressure was measured at 36?months. Factors possibly influencing the blood pressure were assessed using linear regression. All independent variables of interest and confounding variables were included in stepwise multiple regression to identify the model that best predicted blood pressure at 36?months.

Results Greater conditional gains in abdominal circumference (AC) between 0–6 and 24–36?months were associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures at 36?months (p<0.001). Subscapular skinfold and height gains were weakly associated with higher blood pressures, while greater weight gains between 0–6, 12–24 and 24–36?months were more strongly associated, but the dominant influences were AC gains, particularly from 0–6 to 24–36?months. Thus one SD score increases in AC between 0–6 and 24–36?months were associated with 1.59?mm?Hg (95% CI 0.97 to 2.21) and 1.84?mm?Hg (1.24 to 2.46) higher systolic blood pressures, respectively, and 1.04?mm?Hg (0.57 to 1.51) and 1.02?mm?Hg (0.56, 1.48) higher diastolic pressures, respectively.

Conclusions Conditional gains in abdominal circumference, particularly within 6?months of birth and in the year preceding measurement, were more positively associated with blood pressure at 36?months than gains in other anthropometric measures. Above-average AC gains in early childhood may contribute to adult hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease risk.

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Published date: 3 July 2014
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 367160
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/367160
ISSN: 0959-8138
PURE UUID: c20fd29b-172e-4bd9-90cf-129480a53a60
ORCID for S.M. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for W.T. Lawrence: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1264-0438
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for H.M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749

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Date deposited: 23 Jul 2014 16:11
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:57

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Contributors

Author: C.A. Nowson
Author: S.R. Crozier
Author: S.M. Robinson ORCID iD
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: W.T. Lawrence ORCID iD
Author: C.M. Law
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: H.M. Inskip ORCID iD

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