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Narcissism distorts the fading affect bias in autobiographical memory

Narcissism distorts the fading affect bias in autobiographical memory
Narcissism distorts the fading affect bias in autobiographical memory
The Fading Affect Bias (FAB) occurs when the affect associated with personal events fades differentially across time: Positive affect fades slower than negative affect. Three studies examined whether the magnitude of the FAB is moderated by narcissism. Results from Study 1 (diary method, N = 26) showed that low narcissism participants evidenced a large FAB, but high narcissism participants evidenced a reversed FAB. Results from Study 2 (retrospective recall method, N = 110) showed that low narcissism participants evinced a large FAB, and that the FAB diminished or dissipated as narcissism increased. Results from Study 3 (retrospective recall method, N = 83) showed that high narcissists evinced a FAB when they recalled achievement-themed autobiographical events, but evinced a reversed FAB when they recalled communal-themed events. These findings occurred independently of event rehearsal frequency. Results are discussed in terms of the idea that emotion regulation efforts may be disrupted in narcissists.
0888-4080
Ritchie, Timothy D.
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Walker, W. Richard
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Marsh, Shawnda
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Hart, Claire M.
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Skowronski, John J.
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Ritchie, Timothy D.
5e91c0e9-36e5-4912-8b50-3b5a9f1e709a
Walker, W. Richard
c95398d5-3c43-4126-9ff6-34862f76d5ce
Marsh, Shawnda
106a13e1-c716-418f-8eb1-d0813af94b50
Hart, Claire M.
e3db9c72-f493-439c-a358-b3b482d55103
Skowronski, John J.
47eb23aa-177b-4634-b986-5b935998bf6b

Ritchie, Timothy D., Walker, W. Richard, Marsh, Shawnda, Hart, Claire M. and Skowronski, John J. (2014) Narcissism distorts the fading affect bias in autobiographical memory. Applied Cognitive Psychology. (doi:10.1002/acp.3082).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Fading Affect Bias (FAB) occurs when the affect associated with personal events fades differentially across time: Positive affect fades slower than negative affect. Three studies examined whether the magnitude of the FAB is moderated by narcissism. Results from Study 1 (diary method, N = 26) showed that low narcissism participants evidenced a large FAB, but high narcissism participants evidenced a reversed FAB. Results from Study 2 (retrospective recall method, N = 110) showed that low narcissism participants evinced a large FAB, and that the FAB diminished or dissipated as narcissism increased. Results from Study 3 (retrospective recall method, N = 83) showed that high narcissists evinced a FAB when they recalled achievement-themed autobiographical events, but evinced a reversed FAB when they recalled communal-themed events. These findings occurred independently of event rehearsal frequency. Results are discussed in terms of the idea that emotion regulation efforts may be disrupted in narcissists.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 7 October 2014
Organisations: Psychology

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Local EPrints ID: 369934
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/369934
ISSN: 0888-4080
PURE UUID: fd30f347-babf-4b30-83ad-f9f5fff83508

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Date deposited: 14 Oct 2014 12:16
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 18:43

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