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Using mixed methods to develop and evaluate an online weight management intervention

Using mixed methods to develop and evaluate an online weight management intervention
Using mixed methods to develop and evaluate an online weight management intervention
Purpose: This article illustrates the use of mixed methods in the development and evaluation of the Positive Online Weight Reduction (POWeR) programme, an e-health intervention designed to support sustainable weight loss. The studies outlined also explore how human support might enhance intervention usage and weight loss.

Methods: Mixed methods were used to develop and evaluate POWeR. In the development phase, we drew on both quantitative and qualitative findings to plan and gain feedback on the intervention. Next, a feasibility trial, with nested qualitative study, explored what level of human support might lead to the most sustainable weight loss. Finally, a large community based trial of POWeR, with nested qualitative study, explored whether the addition of brief telephone coaching enhances usage.

Results: Findings suggest that POWeR is acceptable and potentially effective. Providing human support enhanced usage in our trials, but was not unproblematic. Interestingly, there were some indications that more basic (brief) human support may produce more sustainable weight loss outcomes than more regular support. Qualitative interviews suggested that more regular support might foster reliance, meaning patients cannot sustain their weight losses when support ends. Qualitative findings in the community trial also suggested explanations for why many people may not take up the opportunity for human support.

Conclusions: Integrating findings from both our qualitative and quantitative studies provided far richer insights than would have been gained using only a single method of inquiry. Further research should investigate the optimum delivery of human support needed to maximise sustainable weight loss in online interventions.
mixed methods, e-health, weight management, obesity, intervention development
1359-107X
45-55
Bradbury, Katherine
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Dennison, Laura
15c399cb-9a81-4948-8906-21944c033c20
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Bradbury, Katherine
87fce0b9-d9c5-42b4-b041-bffeb4430863
Dennison, Laura
15c399cb-9a81-4948-8906-21944c033c20
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

Bradbury, Katherine, Dennison, Laura, Little, Paul and Yardley, Lucy (2015) Using mixed methods to develop and evaluate an online weight management intervention. British Journal of Health Psychology, 20 (1), 45-55. (doi:10.1111/bjhp.12125). (PMID:25406436)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: This article illustrates the use of mixed methods in the development and evaluation of the Positive Online Weight Reduction (POWeR) programme, an e-health intervention designed to support sustainable weight loss. The studies outlined also explore how human support might enhance intervention usage and weight loss.

Methods: Mixed methods were used to develop and evaluate POWeR. In the development phase, we drew on both quantitative and qualitative findings to plan and gain feedback on the intervention. Next, a feasibility trial, with nested qualitative study, explored what level of human support might lead to the most sustainable weight loss. Finally, a large community based trial of POWeR, with nested qualitative study, explored whether the addition of brief telephone coaching enhances usage.

Results: Findings suggest that POWeR is acceptable and potentially effective. Providing human support enhanced usage in our trials, but was not unproblematic. Interestingly, there were some indications that more basic (brief) human support may produce more sustainable weight loss outcomes than more regular support. Qualitative interviews suggested that more regular support might foster reliance, meaning patients cannot sustain their weight losses when support ends. Qualitative findings in the community trial also suggested explanations for why many people may not take up the opportunity for human support.

Conclusions: Integrating findings from both our qualitative and quantitative studies provided far richer insights than would have been gained using only a single method of inquiry. Further research should investigate the optimum delivery of human support needed to maximise sustainable weight loss in online interventions.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 19 November 2014
Published date: February 2015
Keywords: mixed methods, e-health, weight management, obesity, intervention development
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375843
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375843
ISSN: 1359-107X
PURE UUID: fa9a07c6-dc82-4069-b69e-27c4408eccb0
ORCID for Katherine Bradbury: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5513-7571
ORCID for Laura Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0122-6610
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

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Date deposited: 20 Apr 2015 10:04
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:11

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