Exercise intervention in people with cancer undergoing adjuvant cancer treatment following surgery: a systematic review


Loughney, L., West, M.A., Kemp, G.J., Grocott, M.P.W. and Jack, S. (2015) Exercise intervention in people with cancer undergoing adjuvant cancer treatment following surgery: a systematic review European Journal of Surgical Oncology, pp. 1-13. (doi:10.1016/j.ejso.2015.08.153). (PMID:26358569).

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Description/Abstract

Background

Remaining physically active during and after cancer treatment is known to improve associated adverse effects, improve overall survival and reduce the probability of relapse. This systematic review addresses the question: is an exercise training programme beneficial in people with cancer undergoing adjuvant cancer treatment following surgery.

Methods

A systematic database search of Embase, Ovid, Medline without Revisions, SPORTDiscus, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov for any randomised controlled trials (RCT) or non-RCT addressing the effect of an exercise training programme in those having adjuvant cancer treatment following surgery was conducted.

Results

The database search yielded 6489 candidate abstracts of which 94 references included the required terms. A total of 17 articles were included in this review. Exercise training is safe and feasible in the adjuvant setting and furthermore may improve measures of physical fitness and health related quality of life (HRQoL).

Conclusion

This is the first systematic review on exercise training interventions in people with cancer undergoing adjuvant cancer treatment following surgery. Due to the lack of adequately powered RCTs in this area, it remains unclear whether exercise training in this context improves clinical outcomes other physical fitness and HRQoL. It remains unclear what is the optimal timing of initiation of an exercise programme and what are the best combinations of elements within an exercise training programme to optimise training efficacy. Furthermore, it is unclear if initiating such exercise programmes at cancer diagnosis may have a long-lasting effect on physically activity throughout the subsequent life course.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1016/j.ejso.2015.08.153
ISSNs: 0748-7983 (print)
Keywords: cancer, surgery, adjuvant cancer treatment, exercise intervention
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
R Medicine > RD Surgery
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Organisations: Cancer Sciences, Clinical & Experimental Sciences
ePrint ID: 383084
Date :
Date Event
4 August 2015Accepted/In Press
29 August 2015e-pub ahead of print
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2015 10:40
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2017 07:41
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383084

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