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Grip strength among community-dwelling older people predicts hospital admission during the following decade

Grip strength among community-dwelling older people predicts hospital admission during the following decade
Grip strength among community-dwelling older people predicts hospital admission during the following decade
Background: lower grip strength on admission to hospital is known to be associated with longer stay, but the link between customary grip and risk of future admission is less clear.

Objective: to compare grip strength with subsequent risk of hospital admission among community-dwelling older people in a UK setting.

Design: cohort study with linked administrative data.

Setting: Hertfordshire, UK.

Subjects: a total of 2,997 community-dwelling men and women aged 59–73 years at baseline.

Methods: the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS) participants completed a baseline assessment between 1998 and 2004, during which grip strength was measured. Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality data to March 2010 were linked with the HCS database. Statistical models were used to investigate the association of grip strength with subsequent elective, emergency and long-stay hospitalisation and readmission.

Results: there was a statistically significant negative association between grip strength and all classes of admission in women [unadjusted hazard ratio per standard deviation (SD) decrease in grip strength for: any admission/death 1.10 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.14), elective admission/death 1.09 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.13), emergency admission/death 1.21 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.31), long-stay admission/death 1.22 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.32) and unadjusted relative risk per SD decrease in grip strength for 30-day readmission/death 1.30 (95% CI: 1.19, 1.43)]. These associations remained significant after adjustment for potential confounding factors (age, height, weight for height, smoking, alcohol, social class). In men, unadjusted rates for emergency admission/death, long-stay admission/death and readmission/death were significantly associated with grip strength; associations that similarly withstood adjustment.

Conclusion: this study provides the first evidence that grip strength among community-dwelling men and women in the UK is associated with risk of hospital admission over the following decade
hospital admission, readmission, hospital episode statistics, hospitalisation, grip strength, older people
0002-0729
954-959
Simmonds, S.J.
2214e6b5-868a-4dae-8491-fca5d5a8ecb8
Syddall, H.E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Westbury, L.D.
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Dodds, R.M.
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Simmonds, S.J.
2214e6b5-868a-4dae-8491-fca5d5a8ecb8
Syddall, H.E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Westbury, L.D.
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Dodds, R.M.
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Aihie Sayer, A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb

Simmonds, S.J., Syddall, H.E., Westbury, L.D., Dodds, R.M., Cooper, C. and Aihie Sayer, A. (2015) Grip strength among community-dwelling older people predicts hospital admission during the following decade. Age and Ageing, 44 (6), 954-959. (doi:10.1093/ageing/afv146). (PMID:26504117)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: lower grip strength on admission to hospital is known to be associated with longer stay, but the link between customary grip and risk of future admission is less clear.

Objective: to compare grip strength with subsequent risk of hospital admission among community-dwelling older people in a UK setting.

Design: cohort study with linked administrative data.

Setting: Hertfordshire, UK.

Subjects: a total of 2,997 community-dwelling men and women aged 59–73 years at baseline.

Methods: the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS) participants completed a baseline assessment between 1998 and 2004, during which grip strength was measured. Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality data to March 2010 were linked with the HCS database. Statistical models were used to investigate the association of grip strength with subsequent elective, emergency and long-stay hospitalisation and readmission.

Results: there was a statistically significant negative association between grip strength and all classes of admission in women [unadjusted hazard ratio per standard deviation (SD) decrease in grip strength for: any admission/death 1.10 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.14), elective admission/death 1.09 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.13), emergency admission/death 1.21 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.31), long-stay admission/death 1.22 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.32) and unadjusted relative risk per SD decrease in grip strength for 30-day readmission/death 1.30 (95% CI: 1.19, 1.43)]. These associations remained significant after adjustment for potential confounding factors (age, height, weight for height, smoking, alcohol, social class). In men, unadjusted rates for emergency admission/death, long-stay admission/death and readmission/death were significantly associated with grip strength; associations that similarly withstood adjustment.

Conclusion: this study provides the first evidence that grip strength among community-dwelling men and women in the UK is associated with risk of hospital admission over the following decade

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 July 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 October 2015
Published date: November 2015
Keywords: hospital admission, readmission, hospital episode statistics, hospitalisation, grip strength, older people
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384107
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384107
ISSN: 0002-0729
PURE UUID: d259e554-1c0b-4791-b4c7-66577552d8a8
ORCID for H.E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for R.M. Dodds: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4968-7678
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 07 Dec 2015 10:33
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:56

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Contributors

Author: S.J. Simmonds
Author: H.E. Syddall ORCID iD
Author: L.D. Westbury
Author: R.M. Dodds ORCID iD
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: A. Aihie Sayer

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