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Mixing and characterisation of multi-component materials for pyrotechnic applications

Mixing and characterisation of multi-component materials for pyrotechnic applications
Mixing and characterisation of multi-component materials for pyrotechnic applications
This multidisciplinary research studied the relationship between components of a pyrotechnic product and how manufacturing, in particular the mixing method employed, affects its macroscopic structure and properties. For pyrotechnics to produce the desired effect the ingredients must be intimately mixed, however, the present physical mixing approach can lead to inconsistencies in performance between batches. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to investigate the distribution of components in a pyrotechnic mixture. Near neighbour distances between particles were calculated and used to assess the homogeneity of the mixtures and the efficiency of combustion.

Another strand of this research to overcome batch inconsistencies was by chemically binding pyrotechnic ingredients rather than physically mixing them together. One method of achieving this was through incorporating two or more components within the same crystalline lattice. This may be achieved through co-crystallisation or coordination in functional frameworks, thereby reducing the number of components in a physical mixture and minimising the variation between batches. Li et al. have investigated using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to stabilise energetic materials.1 The research presented here uses MOFs to bring together fuels and oxidisers into one framework to create a so-called MOFirework. Numerous linkers and metal centres were investigated to build up a structural family to correlate structure with pyrotechnic function (e.g. changing burn colour; Sr = red, Ba = green).

Both powder and single crystal Xray diffraction were used to characterise the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the thermal profiles to investigate their possible uses as pyrotechnics. Lastly, a burn test was carried out to determine their pyrotechnic effect.
Blair, Lisa
767eac75-b6d4-401d-b1b6-bde8d818a998
Blair, Lisa
767eac75-b6d4-401d-b1b6-bde8d818a998
Coles, Simon
3116f58b-c30c-48cf-bdd5-397d1c1fecf8

Blair, Lisa (2015) Mixing and characterisation of multi-component materials for pyrotechnic applications. University of Southampton, Chemistry, Doctoral Thesis, 283pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This multidisciplinary research studied the relationship between components of a pyrotechnic product and how manufacturing, in particular the mixing method employed, affects its macroscopic structure and properties. For pyrotechnics to produce the desired effect the ingredients must be intimately mixed, however, the present physical mixing approach can lead to inconsistencies in performance between batches. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to investigate the distribution of components in a pyrotechnic mixture. Near neighbour distances between particles were calculated and used to assess the homogeneity of the mixtures and the efficiency of combustion.

Another strand of this research to overcome batch inconsistencies was by chemically binding pyrotechnic ingredients rather than physically mixing them together. One method of achieving this was through incorporating two or more components within the same crystalline lattice. This may be achieved through co-crystallisation or coordination in functional frameworks, thereby reducing the number of components in a physical mixture and minimising the variation between batches. Li et al. have investigated using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to stabilise energetic materials.1 The research presented here uses MOFs to bring together fuels and oxidisers into one framework to create a so-called MOFirework. Numerous linkers and metal centres were investigated to build up a structural family to correlate structure with pyrotechnic function (e.g. changing burn colour; Sr = red, Ba = green).

Both powder and single crystal Xray diffraction were used to characterise the products. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the thermal profiles to investigate their possible uses as pyrotechnics. Lastly, a burn test was carried out to determine their pyrotechnic effect.

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More information

Published date: 16 November 2015
Organisations: University of Southampton, Chemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 384949
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/384949
PURE UUID: 5525dbad-6eef-453a-a366-6dc7e04bd974
ORCID for Simon Coles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8414-9272

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jan 2016 11:51
Last modified: 16 Nov 2018 05:01

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