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Sports-based intervention and the problem of youth offending: a diverse enough tool for a diverse society?

Sports-based intervention and the problem of youth offending: a diverse enough tool for a diverse society?
Sports-based intervention and the problem of youth offending: a diverse enough tool for a diverse society?
This paper discusses sports-based interventions (SBIs) and the problem of youth crime. It notes the positive role sport can play in changing to better the lives of young people. However, there is a lack of robust evidence to support the argument that participation in sporting activity can lead to a reduction in anti-social and offending behaviour. The paper discusses how through focusing on ‘individual needs’ and ‘pathways to work’, SBIs can become overly reductionist and mask broader structural class-, gender- and race-based inequalities that permeate through neoliberal nation-states and western criminal justice systems. It concludes that SBI advocates must seek to promote a less homogeneous idea of what an SBI is, as well as be more sensitive to the diverse needs of young people, particularly if they are to tackle the underlying structural inequalities that arguably create the social problem, that is youth crime in the first place.
1743-0437
1279-1292
cHAMBERLAIN, J.
d8b66386-a907-45ea-9e64-3f3e77359dc8
cHAMBERLAIN, J.
d8b66386-a907-45ea-9e64-3f3e77359dc8

cHAMBERLAIN, J. (2013) Sports-based intervention and the problem of youth offending: a diverse enough tool for a diverse society? [in special issue: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Sport and Leisure] Sport in Society, 16 (10), 1279-1292. (doi:10.1080/17430437.2013.821251).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper discusses sports-based interventions (SBIs) and the problem of youth crime. It notes the positive role sport can play in changing to better the lives of young people. However, there is a lack of robust evidence to support the argument that participation in sporting activity can lead to a reduction in anti-social and offending behaviour. The paper discusses how through focusing on ‘individual needs’ and ‘pathways to work’, SBIs can become overly reductionist and mask broader structural class-, gender- and race-based inequalities that permeate through neoliberal nation-states and western criminal justice systems. It concludes that SBI advocates must seek to promote a less homogeneous idea of what an SBI is, as well as be more sensitive to the diverse needs of young people, particularly if they are to tackle the underlying structural inequalities that arguably create the social problem, that is youth crime in the first place.

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Accepted/In Press date: 15 January 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 July 2013
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 385834
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/385834
ISSN: 1743-0437
PURE UUID: 1e09ec19-e167-46ba-8a03-48017ab78cb0

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Date deposited: 25 Jan 2016 11:18
Last modified: 20 Nov 2021 23:27

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Author: J. cHAMBERLAIN

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