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Touch influences perceived gloss

Touch influences perceived gloss
Touch influences perceived gloss
Identifying an object’s material properties supports recognition and action planning: we grasp objects according to how heavy, hard or slippery we expect them to be. Visual cues to material qualities such as gloss have recently received attention, but how they interact with haptic (touch) information has been largely overlooked. Here, we show that touch modulates gloss perception: objects that feel slippery are perceived as glossier (more shiny).

Participants explored virtual objects that varied in look and feel. A discrimination paradigm (Experiment 1) revealed that observers integrate visual gloss with haptic information. Observers could easily detect an increase in glossiness when it was paired with a decrease in friction. In contrast, increased glossiness coupled with decreased slipperiness produced a small perceptual change: the visual and haptic changes counteracted each other. Subjective ratings (Experiment 2) reflected a similar interaction – slippery objects were rated as glossier and vice versa.

The sensory system treats visual gloss and haptic friction as correlated cues to surface material. Although friction is not a perfect predictor of gloss, the visual system appears to know and use a probabilistic relationship between these variables to bias perception – a sensible strategy given the ambiguity of visual clues to gloss.
1-12
Adams, W.
25685aaa-fc54-4d25-8d65-f35f4c5ab688
Kerrigan, I.S.
92d41e97-dba3-41de-b3a9-ef9b15b63914
Graf, Erich
1a5123e2-8f05-4084-a6e6-837dcfc66209
Adams, W.
25685aaa-fc54-4d25-8d65-f35f4c5ab688
Kerrigan, I.S.
92d41e97-dba3-41de-b3a9-ef9b15b63914
Graf, Erich
1a5123e2-8f05-4084-a6e6-837dcfc66209

Adams, W., Kerrigan, I.S. and Graf, Erich (2016) Touch influences perceived gloss Scientific Reports, 6, (21866), pp. 1-12. (doi:10.1038/srep21866).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Identifying an object’s material properties supports recognition and action planning: we grasp objects according to how heavy, hard or slippery we expect them to be. Visual cues to material qualities such as gloss have recently received attention, but how they interact with haptic (touch) information has been largely overlooked. Here, we show that touch modulates gloss perception: objects that feel slippery are perceived as glossier (more shiny).

Participants explored virtual objects that varied in look and feel. A discrimination paradigm (Experiment 1) revealed that observers integrate visual gloss with haptic information. Observers could easily detect an increase in glossiness when it was paired with a decrease in friction. In contrast, increased glossiness coupled with decreased slipperiness produced a small perceptual change: the visual and haptic changes counteracted each other. Subjective ratings (Experiment 2) reflected a similar interaction – slippery objects were rated as glossier and vice versa.

The sensory system treats visual gloss and haptic friction as correlated cues to surface material. Although friction is not a perfect predictor of gloss, the visual system appears to know and use a probabilistic relationship between these variables to bias perception – a sensible strategy given the ambiguity of visual clues to gloss.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 February 2016
Published date: 2016
Organisations: Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 386857
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/386857
PURE UUID: 8eef9264-5421-4e15-ae98-75831cf9c6de
ORCID for W. Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5832-1056
ORCID for Erich Graf: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3162-4233

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Feb 2016 16:39
Last modified: 03 Oct 2017 16:39

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Contributors

Author: W. Adams ORCID iD
Author: I.S. Kerrigan
Author: Erich Graf ORCID iD

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