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Developments of numerical methods for linear and nonlinear fluid-solid interaction dynamics with applications

Developments of numerical methods for linear and nonlinear fluid-solid interaction dynamics with applications
Developments of numerical methods for linear and nonlinear fluid-solid interaction dynamics with applications
This paper presents a review on some developments of numerical methods for linear and nonlinear fluid-solid interaction (FSI) problems with their applications in engineering. The discussion covers the four types of numerical methods: 1) mixed finite element (FE)-substructure-subdomain model to deal with linear FSI in a finite domain, such as sloshing, acoustic-structure interactions, pressure waves in fluids, earthquake responses of chemical vessels, dam-water couplings, etc.; 2) mixed FE-boundary element (BE) model to solve linear FSI with infinite domains, for example, VLFS subject to airplane landing impacts, ship dynamic response caused by cannon / missile fire impacts, etc.; 3) mixed FE-finite difference (FD) / volume (FV) model for nonlinear FSI problems with no separations between fluids and solids and breaking waves; 4) mixed FE-smooth particle (SP) method to simulate nonlinear FSI problems with f-s separations as well as breaking waves. The partitioned iteration approach is suggested in base of available fluid and solid codes to separately solve their governing equations in a time step, and then through reaching its convergence in coupling iteration to forward until the problem solved. The selected application examples include air-liquid-shell three phases interactions, LNG ship-water sloshing; acoustic analysis of air-building interaction system excited by human foot impacts; transient dynamic response of an airplane-VLFS-water interaction system excited by airplane landing impacts; turbulence flow-body interactions; structure dropping down on the water surface with breaking waves, etc. The numerical results are compared with the available experiment or numerical data to demonstrate the accuracy of the discussed approaches and their values for engineering applications. Based on FSI analysis, linear and nonlinear wave energy harvesting devices are listed to use the resonance in a linear system and the periodical solution in a nonlinear system, such as flutter, to effectively harvest wave energy. There are 231 references are given in the paper, which provides very useful resources for readers to further investigate their interesting approaches.
1000-0992
1-45
Xing, Jing
d4fe7ae0-2668-422a-8d89-9e66527835ce
Xing, Jing
d4fe7ae0-2668-422a-8d89-9e66527835ce

Xing, Jing (2016) Developments of numerical methods for linear and nonlinear fluid-solid interaction dynamics with applications. Advances in Mechanics, 46 (201602), 1-45. (doi:10.6052/1000-0992-15-038).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper presents a review on some developments of numerical methods for linear and nonlinear fluid-solid interaction (FSI) problems with their applications in engineering. The discussion covers the four types of numerical methods: 1) mixed finite element (FE)-substructure-subdomain model to deal with linear FSI in a finite domain, such as sloshing, acoustic-structure interactions, pressure waves in fluids, earthquake responses of chemical vessels, dam-water couplings, etc.; 2) mixed FE-boundary element (BE) model to solve linear FSI with infinite domains, for example, VLFS subject to airplane landing impacts, ship dynamic response caused by cannon / missile fire impacts, etc.; 3) mixed FE-finite difference (FD) / volume (FV) model for nonlinear FSI problems with no separations between fluids and solids and breaking waves; 4) mixed FE-smooth particle (SP) method to simulate nonlinear FSI problems with f-s separations as well as breaking waves. The partitioned iteration approach is suggested in base of available fluid and solid codes to separately solve their governing equations in a time step, and then through reaching its convergence in coupling iteration to forward until the problem solved. The selected application examples include air-liquid-shell three phases interactions, LNG ship-water sloshing; acoustic analysis of air-building interaction system excited by human foot impacts; transient dynamic response of an airplane-VLFS-water interaction system excited by airplane landing impacts; turbulence flow-body interactions; structure dropping down on the water surface with breaking waves, etc. The numerical results are compared with the available experiment or numerical data to demonstrate the accuracy of the discussed approaches and their values for engineering applications. Based on FSI analysis, linear and nonlinear wave energy harvesting devices are listed to use the resonance in a linear system and the periodical solution in a nonlinear system, such as flutter, to effectively harvest wave energy. There are 231 references are given in the paper, which provides very useful resources for readers to further investigate their interesting approaches.

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Submitted date: 8 October 2015
Accepted/In Press date: 17 November 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 December 2015
Published date: 2016
Organisations: Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 387214
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/387214
ISSN: 1000-0992
PURE UUID: 3aa95d51-2aba-4794-b65d-3c92a0b3fca7

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Date deposited: 16 Feb 2016 15:34
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 06:19

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