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Experimental analysis of small masonry panels subject to long duration blast loading

Experimental analysis of small masonry panels subject to long duration blast loading
Experimental analysis of small masonry panels subject to long duration blast loading
Much research has been conducted towards short duration blast loading and its interaction with structures. The positive phase duration, t+, of a typical short duration high explosive blast is often below t+= 100ms. For the purposes of this research, long duration blast is considered to be an explosive event in which t+>100ms. This type of blast load offers added complexity when dealing with its interaction with structures due to the high impulses, drag winds and associated dynamic pressures.

As part of an extended research study to develop a set of predictive algorithms, this paper investigates the breakage patterns and debris distribution of masonry panels subject to long duration blast loads. Experimental trials were conducted using the Air Blast Tunnel at MoD Shoeburyness, a specialised facility for long duration blast, in which two masonry panels were tested. The trials displayed varying degrees of breakage followed by a substantial debris distribution in both cases.
long duration, blast, masonry, impulse, breakage, debris
Keys, Richard
8d6aeaf4-fd64-4d29-93a1-34ae9e3e592d
Clubley, Simon
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd
Keys, Richard
8d6aeaf4-fd64-4d29-93a1-34ae9e3e592d
Clubley, Simon
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd

Keys, Richard and Clubley, Simon (2015) Experimental analysis of small masonry panels subject to long duration blast loading. 16th International Symposium for the Interaction of the Effects of Munitions with Structures (ISIEMS), Destin, United States. 09 - 13 Nov 2015. 7 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Much research has been conducted towards short duration blast loading and its interaction with structures. The positive phase duration, t+, of a typical short duration high explosive blast is often below t+= 100ms. For the purposes of this research, long duration blast is considered to be an explosive event in which t+>100ms. This type of blast load offers added complexity when dealing with its interaction with structures due to the high impulses, drag winds and associated dynamic pressures.

As part of an extended research study to develop a set of predictive algorithms, this paper investigates the breakage patterns and debris distribution of masonry panels subject to long duration blast loads. Experimental trials were conducted using the Air Blast Tunnel at MoD Shoeburyness, a specialised facility for long duration blast, in which two masonry panels were tested. The trials displayed varying degrees of breakage followed by a substantial debris distribution in both cases.

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More information

Published date: 9 November 2015
Venue - Dates: 16th International Symposium for the Interaction of the Effects of Munitions with Structures (ISIEMS), Destin, United States, 2015-11-09 - 2015-11-13
Keywords: long duration, blast, masonry, impulse, breakage, debris
Organisations: Infrastructure Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 388405
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/388405
PURE UUID: ac313ce5-ef6b-4e1d-a17e-b13fbc994a8b
ORCID for Simon Clubley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3779-242X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Mar 2016 14:35
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:18

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