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Coronary heart disease and household air pollution from use of solid fuel: a systematic review

Coronary heart disease and household air pollution from use of solid fuel: a systematic review
Coronary heart disease and household air pollution from use of solid fuel: a systematic review
Background: Evidence is emerging that indoor air pollution (IAP) from use of solid fuels for cooking and heating may be an important risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD).

Sources of data: We searched the Ovid Medline, Embase Classic, Embase and Web of Science databases from inception through to June 12, 2015, to identify reports of primary epidemiological research concerning the relationship of CHD to IAP from solid fuel, the likely magnitude of any increase in risk, and potential pathogenic mechanisms.

Areas of agreement: The current balance of epidemiological evidence points to an increased risk of CHD from IAP as a consequence of using solid, and especially biomass, fuels for cooking and heating. Relative risks from long-term exposure could be 2- to 4-fold.

Areas of controversy: The evidence base is still limited, and although an association of CHD with such IAP from solid fuel is consistent with the known hazards from smoking, environmental tobacco smoke and ambient air pollution, and supported by evidence of effects on inflammatory processes, atherosclerosis and blood pressure, it requires confirmation by larger and more robust studies.

Growing points: The completion of two relatively small case-control studies on CHD and IAP from use of biomass fuel demonstrates the feasibility of such research, and is an encouragement to further, larger studies using similar methods.

Areas timely for developing research: The need for such research is particularly pressing because the incidence of CHD in developing countries is rising, and IAP may interact synergistically with the risk factors that are driving that increase. Furthermore, relatively cheap methods are available to reduce IAP from use of solid fuels, and there are indications from intervention studies that these may impact beneficially on CHD as well as other diseases caused by such pollution.
0007-1420
1-19
Fatmi, Z.
8c48d9e9-4db2-4cfc-84ad-29b29619f95b
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Fatmi, Z.
8c48d9e9-4db2-4cfc-84ad-29b29619f95b
Coggon, D.
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3

Fatmi, Z. and Coggon, D. (2016) Coronary heart disease and household air pollution from use of solid fuel: a systematic review. British Medical Bulletin, 1-19. (doi:10.1093/bmb/ldw015). (PMID:27151956)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Evidence is emerging that indoor air pollution (IAP) from use of solid fuels for cooking and heating may be an important risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD).

Sources of data: We searched the Ovid Medline, Embase Classic, Embase and Web of Science databases from inception through to June 12, 2015, to identify reports of primary epidemiological research concerning the relationship of CHD to IAP from solid fuel, the likely magnitude of any increase in risk, and potential pathogenic mechanisms.

Areas of agreement: The current balance of epidemiological evidence points to an increased risk of CHD from IAP as a consequence of using solid, and especially biomass, fuels for cooking and heating. Relative risks from long-term exposure could be 2- to 4-fold.

Areas of controversy: The evidence base is still limited, and although an association of CHD with such IAP from solid fuel is consistent with the known hazards from smoking, environmental tobacco smoke and ambient air pollution, and supported by evidence of effects on inflammatory processes, atherosclerosis and blood pressure, it requires confirmation by larger and more robust studies.

Growing points: The completion of two relatively small case-control studies on CHD and IAP from use of biomass fuel demonstrates the feasibility of such research, and is an encouragement to further, larger studies using similar methods.

Areas timely for developing research: The need for such research is particularly pressing because the incidence of CHD in developing countries is rising, and IAP may interact synergistically with the risk factors that are driving that increase. Furthermore, relatively cheap methods are available to reduce IAP from use of solid fuels, and there are indications from intervention studies that these may impact beneficially on CHD as well as other diseases caused by such pollution.

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Biomass CHD review 07032016.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 March 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 May 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 390742
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/390742
ISSN: 0007-1420
PURE UUID: 382d21a0-2bcb-4614-9c06-1923aa1f5b99
ORCID for D. Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

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Date deposited: 06 Apr 2016 15:41
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 06:52

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Author: Z. Fatmi
Author: D. Coggon ORCID iD

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