The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Job dissatisfaction and the older worker: baseline findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty study

Job dissatisfaction and the older worker: baseline findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty study
Job dissatisfaction and the older worker: baseline findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty study
Objectives: Demographic changes are requiring people to work longer. Labour force participation might be promoted by tackling sources of job dissatisfaction. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of job dissatisfaction in older British workers, to explore which perceptions of work contribute most importantly, and to assess possible impacts on health.

Methods: Participants aged 50–64?years were recruited from 24 English general practices. At baseline, those currently in work (N=5437) reported on their demographic and employment circumstances, overall job satisfaction, perceptions of their work that might contribute to dissatisfaction, and their general health, mood and well-being. Associations of job dissatisfaction with risk factors and potential health outcomes were assessed cross-sectionally by logistic regression, and the potential contributions of different negative perceptions to overall dissatisfaction were summarised by population attributable fractions (PAFs).

Results: Job dissatisfaction was more common among men, below age 60?years, those living in London and the South East, in the more educated and in those working for larger employers. The main contributors to job dissatisfaction among employees were feeling unappreciated and/or lacking a sense of achievement (PAF 55–56%), while in the self-employed, job insecurity was the leading contributor (PAF 79%). Job dissatisfaction was associated with all of the adverse health outcomes examined (ORs of 3–5), as were most of the negative perceptions of work that contributed to overall dissatisfaction.

Conclusions: Employment policies aimed at improving job satisfaction in older workers may benefit from focussing particularly on relationships in the workplace, fairness, job security and instilling a sense of achievement.
1351-0711
512-519
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Harris, Clare
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Gale, Catharine
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
van Staa, Tjeerd
76db275d-12ed-44e8-8dd1-2d70e945fc07
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
Palmer, Keith
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850
D'angelo, Stefania
13375ecd-1117-4b6e-99c0-32239f52eed6
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Harris, Clare
3e4bd946-3f09-45a1-8725-d35e80dd7971
Linaker, Catherine
6c6d1b90-ee40-4c96-8b2e-b06efbe030ae
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Gale, Catharine
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
van Staa, Tjeerd
76db275d-12ed-44e8-8dd1-2d70e945fc07
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Walker-Bone, Karen
ad7d1336-ed2c-4f39-ade5-da84eb412109
Palmer, Keith
0cfe63f0-1d33-40ff-ae8c-6c33601df850

D'angelo, Stefania, Coggon, David, Harris, Clare, Linaker, Catherine, Aihie Sayer, Avan, Gale, Catharine, Evandrou, Maria, van Staa, Tjeerd, Cooper, Cyrus, Walker-Bone, Karen and Palmer, Keith (2016) Job dissatisfaction and the older worker: baseline findings from the Health and Employment After Fifty study. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 73, 512-519. (doi:10.1136/oemed-2016-103591). (PMID:27152012)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: Demographic changes are requiring people to work longer. Labour force participation might be promoted by tackling sources of job dissatisfaction. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of job dissatisfaction in older British workers, to explore which perceptions of work contribute most importantly, and to assess possible impacts on health.

Methods: Participants aged 50–64?years were recruited from 24 English general practices. At baseline, those currently in work (N=5437) reported on their demographic and employment circumstances, overall job satisfaction, perceptions of their work that might contribute to dissatisfaction, and their general health, mood and well-being. Associations of job dissatisfaction with risk factors and potential health outcomes were assessed cross-sectionally by logistic regression, and the potential contributions of different negative perceptions to overall dissatisfaction were summarised by population attributable fractions (PAFs).

Results: Job dissatisfaction was more common among men, below age 60?years, those living in London and the South East, in the more educated and in those working for larger employers. The main contributors to job dissatisfaction among employees were feeling unappreciated and/or lacking a sense of achievement (PAF 55–56%), while in the self-employed, job insecurity was the leading contributor (PAF 79%). Job dissatisfaction was associated with all of the adverse health outcomes examined (ORs of 3–5), as were most of the negative perceptions of work that contributed to overall dissatisfaction.

Conclusions: Employment policies aimed at improving job satisfaction in older workers may benefit from focussing particularly on relationships in the workplace, fairness, job security and instilling a sense of achievement.

Text
job satisfaction 1st revision Oemed-2016010359 8.4.16 untracked.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (79kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 May 2016
Published date: August 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393085
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393085
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: e05642b2-ee91-412b-b47c-1d7dc0ef8026
ORCID for Stefania D'angelo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7267-1837
ORCID for David Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987
ORCID for Clare Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8037-566X
ORCID for Catherine Linaker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1091-9283
ORCID for Catharine Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638
ORCID for Maria Evandrou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2115-9358
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Karen Walker-Bone: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5992-1459

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Apr 2016 14:05
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:20

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Stefania D'angelo ORCID iD
Author: David Coggon ORCID iD
Author: Clare Harris ORCID iD
Author: Avan Aihie Sayer
Author: Catharine Gale ORCID iD
Author: Maria Evandrou ORCID iD
Author: Tjeerd van Staa
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Keith Palmer

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×