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Message received? Examining transmission in deliberative systems

Message received? Examining transmission in deliberative systems
Message received? Examining transmission in deliberative systems
With the systemic turn in deliberative democratic theory, there is renewed and broadened emphasis on the inclusion of all affected by a political decision in the making of those decisions. The key enabler of inclusion at a system level is transmission: theoretically a deliberative system is more democratic if it can foster the transmission of claims and ideas across different sites, especially between informal sites of public deliberation and the more formal institutions of political decision-making. Yet little is known about the mechanisms of transmission in deliberative systems. How, and to what effect, is transmission facilitated in practice? This paper draws on case studies of three promising mechanisms of deliberative transmission: institutional, innovative and discursive. We discuss the key factors that enable or hinder different forms of transmission, and reflect on the ways in which they might be strengthened in deliberative systems. Our analysis suggests that the systemic turn in deliberative democracy should go hand-in-hand with a nuanced understanding of how transmission occurs across different sites. As such, our discussion has important implications for deliberative scholars and practitioners as they go about conceptualising, studying and steering deliberative democracy at the large scale.
1946-0171
263-283
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Hendriks, Carolyn
2a601b01-0c44-4c49-92ec-34a6a7854b56
Ercan, Selen
20a14326-3738-4bfc-b443-f6404eae73f0
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Hendriks, Carolyn
2a601b01-0c44-4c49-92ec-34a6a7854b56
Ercan, Selen
20a14326-3738-4bfc-b443-f6404eae73f0

Boswell, John, Hendriks, Carolyn and Ercan, Selen (2016) Message received? Examining transmission in deliberative systems. Critical Policy Studies, 10 (3), 263-283. (doi:10.1080/19460171.2016.1188712).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With the systemic turn in deliberative democratic theory, there is renewed and broadened emphasis on the inclusion of all affected by a political decision in the making of those decisions. The key enabler of inclusion at a system level is transmission: theoretically a deliberative system is more democratic if it can foster the transmission of claims and ideas across different sites, especially between informal sites of public deliberation and the more formal institutions of political decision-making. Yet little is known about the mechanisms of transmission in deliberative systems. How, and to what effect, is transmission facilitated in practice? This paper draws on case studies of three promising mechanisms of deliberative transmission: institutional, innovative and discursive. We discuss the key factors that enable or hinder different forms of transmission, and reflect on the ways in which they might be strengthened in deliberative systems. Our analysis suggests that the systemic turn in deliberative democracy should go hand-in-hand with a nuanced understanding of how transmission occurs across different sites. As such, our discussion has important implications for deliberative scholars and practitioners as they go about conceptualising, studying and steering deliberative democracy at the large scale.

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Accepted/In Press date: 22 January 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 October 2016
Published date: 18 October 2016
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393223
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393223
ISSN: 1946-0171
PURE UUID: 66b1fe0b-1902-465e-8470-041d52bd47f8
ORCID for John Boswell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3018-8791

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2016 13:03
Last modified: 20 Mar 2020 01:33

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