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Investigations of lymphatic fluid flow

Investigations of lymphatic fluid flow
Investigations of lymphatic fluid flow
The lymphatic system returns fluid to the blood stream from the tissues to maintain tissue fluid homeostasis. The collecting lymphatic vessels actively pump fluid against a body scale pressure gradient, i.e., from tissue interstitial space to the venous side of the blood circulatory system. The collecting lymphatic vessels pass the lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes that filter the lymph before it is returned to the circulatory system.

This thesis presents work undertaken to create a fluid structure interaction model of a lymph node with afferent and efferent lymphatic vessels. The model is built in COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial finite element software.

Four pieces of novel work are presented in this thesis. Firstly, an optimisation method used to approximate the material properties for the collecting lymphatic vessel from the pressure diameter behaviour. Secondly, model of the collecting lymphatic valve with surrounding wall used to investigate valve closing behaviour. Thirdly, an image based model of a lymph node where the material properties are optimised to experimental data and based on selective plane illumination microscopy images. Finally, an image based model of a lymph node based on computed tomography images that shows how the structure within the node affects the fluid flow pathways.
Cooper, Laura
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Cooper, Laura
b8f4b942-cb87-4386-ab29-17bdd0f53ec1
Roose, Tiina
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Cooper, Laura (2016) Investigations of lymphatic fluid flow. University of Southampton, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, Doctoral Thesis, 238pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The lymphatic system returns fluid to the blood stream from the tissues to maintain tissue fluid homeostasis. The collecting lymphatic vessels actively pump fluid against a body scale pressure gradient, i.e., from tissue interstitial space to the venous side of the blood circulatory system. The collecting lymphatic vessels pass the lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes that filter the lymph before it is returned to the circulatory system.

This thesis presents work undertaken to create a fluid structure interaction model of a lymph node with afferent and efferent lymphatic vessels. The model is built in COMSOL Multiphysics, a commercial finite element software.

Four pieces of novel work are presented in this thesis. Firstly, an optimisation method used to approximate the material properties for the collecting lymphatic vessel from the pressure diameter behaviour. Secondly, model of the collecting lymphatic valve with surrounding wall used to investigate valve closing behaviour. Thirdly, an image based model of a lymph node where the material properties are optimised to experimental data and based on selective plane illumination microscopy images. Finally, an image based model of a lymph node based on computed tomography images that shows how the structure within the node affects the fluid flow pathways.

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Final E-Thesis for E-Prints COOPER 25782363.pdf - Other
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More information

Published date: 1 March 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393578
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393578
PURE UUID: 6c32ca5a-3067-4a63-b110-a9d02317538a
ORCID for Laura Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0198-7591
ORCID for Tiina Roose: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8710-1063

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2016 13:01
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:36

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Contributors

Author: Laura Cooper ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Tiina Roose ORCID iD

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