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Damage mechanisms at the cement-implant interface of polished cemented femoral stems

Damage mechanisms at the cement-implant interface of polished cemented femoral stems
Damage mechanisms at the cement-implant interface of polished cemented femoral stems
The occurrence of damage on polished femoral stems has been widely reported in the literature, and bone cement has been implicated in a tribo-corrosive failure process. However, the mechanisms of cement-mediated damage and the impact of cement formulation on this process are not well understood. In this study, thirteen Zimmer CPT polished femoral stems and corresponding cement specimens were retrieved at revision surgery and analysed using high-resolution imaging techniques. Surface damage attributed to tribo-corrosion was observed on all stems. Corrosion product, in the form of black flaky surface debris, was observed on the surface of cement specimens; both energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX)and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry(ICP-MS) confirmed the presence of cobalt and chromium, with the ICP-MS showing much higher levels of Cr compared to Co when compared to the original stem material. Agglomerates of ZrO2 radiopacifier were also identified on the cement surface, and in some cases showed evidence of abrasive wear; the size of these particles correlated well with elliptical pitting evident on the surfaces of the corresponding stems. This evidence supports the hypothesis that agglomerates of hard radiopacifier particles within the cement may induce a wear-dominated tribo-corrosive interaction at the stem-cement interface that damages the surface of polished CoCr femoral stems
bone cement, implant retrieval, failure analysis, cobalt–chromium alloys, corrosion
1552-4973
2027–2033
Shearwood-Porter, Natalie
bc763681-a62a-4e32-9c77-3a49e725b5f3
Browne, Martin
6578cc37-7bd6-43b9-ae5c-77ccb7726397
Milton, James A.
9e183221-d0d4-4ddb-aeba-0fdde9d31230
Cooper, Matthew J.
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Palmer, Martin R.
d2e60e81-5d6e-4ddb-a243-602537286080
Latham, Jeremy M.
c63671a2-248f-489f-b620-64ff19bc20f5
Wood, Robert J. K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Cook, Richard B.
06f8322d-81be-4f82-9326-19e55541c78f
Shearwood-Porter, Natalie
bc763681-a62a-4e32-9c77-3a49e725b5f3
Browne, Martin
6578cc37-7bd6-43b9-ae5c-77ccb7726397
Milton, James A.
9e183221-d0d4-4ddb-aeba-0fdde9d31230
Cooper, Matthew J.
54f7bff0-1f8c-4835-8358-71eef8529e7a
Palmer, Martin R.
d2e60e81-5d6e-4ddb-a243-602537286080
Latham, Jeremy M.
c63671a2-248f-489f-b620-64ff19bc20f5
Wood, Robert J. K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Cook, Richard B.
06f8322d-81be-4f82-9326-19e55541c78f

Shearwood-Porter, Natalie, Browne, Martin, Milton, James A., Cooper, Matthew J., Palmer, Martin R., Latham, Jeremy M., Wood, Robert J. K. and Cook, Richard B. (2017) Damage mechanisms at the cement-implant interface of polished cemented femoral stems. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, 105 (7), 2027–2033. (doi:10.1002/jbm.b.33739).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The occurrence of damage on polished femoral stems has been widely reported in the literature, and bone cement has been implicated in a tribo-corrosive failure process. However, the mechanisms of cement-mediated damage and the impact of cement formulation on this process are not well understood. In this study, thirteen Zimmer CPT polished femoral stems and corresponding cement specimens were retrieved at revision surgery and analysed using high-resolution imaging techniques. Surface damage attributed to tribo-corrosion was observed on all stems. Corrosion product, in the form of black flaky surface debris, was observed on the surface of cement specimens; both energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX)and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry(ICP-MS) confirmed the presence of cobalt and chromium, with the ICP-MS showing much higher levels of Cr compared to Co when compared to the original stem material. Agglomerates of ZrO2 radiopacifier were also identified on the cement surface, and in some cases showed evidence of abrasive wear; the size of these particles correlated well with elliptical pitting evident on the surfaces of the corresponding stems. This evidence supports the hypothesis that agglomerates of hard radiopacifier particles within the cement may induce a wear-dominated tribo-corrosive interaction at the stem-cement interface that damages the surface of polished CoCr femoral stems

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 June 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 July 2016
Published date: 1 October 2017
Keywords: bone cement, implant retrieval, failure analysis, cobalt–chromium alloys, corrosion
Organisations: Geochemistry, nCATS Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 393796
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/393796
ISSN: 1552-4973
PURE UUID: 7385d6ba-898c-449d-a739-c992fca9b967
ORCID for Martin Browne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5184-050X
ORCID for James A. Milton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4245-5532
ORCID for Matthew J. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2130-2759
ORCID for Robert J. K. Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239
ORCID for Richard B. Cook: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2468-5820

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Jun 2016 07:32
Last modified: 16 Jun 2022 04:01

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Contributors

Author: Natalie Shearwood-Porter
Author: Martin Browne ORCID iD
Author: James A. Milton ORCID iD
Author: Jeremy M. Latham
Author: Richard B. Cook ORCID iD

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