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Correlates of psychological outcomes among family members of people with diabetes in the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™ ) study

Correlates of psychological outcomes among family members of people with diabetes in the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™ ) study
Correlates of psychological outcomes among family members of people with diabetes in the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™ ) study
Aims: to conduct a second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™) study, examining the experiences of family members caring for adults with diabetes in order to identify correlates of family member psychological outcomes (generic psychological well-being, perceived quality of life, and diabetes-related burden, impact and distress).

Methods: a total of 2057 family members living with a person with diabetes and involved in their care participated in an online, telephone or in-person survey. Samples of 120 respondents were recruited in each of 17 countries. Significant (P<0.05) correlates of psychological outcomes were identified by multi-level multiple regression.

Results: outcomes were worse for family members not working because of diabetes or those who had other competing obligations. Outcomes were worse if the person with diabetes was not a partner or parent, used injected diabetes medication, or had more frequent hypoglycaemia. Outcomes were worse for family members who believed that diabetes was more severe, were more involved in diabetes care, had more conflict over diabetes care or were frustrated about not knowing how to help the person with diabetes. Outcomes were better for those who had greater support from others and felt they found good ways to help the person with diabetes. There were significant differences in outcomes among countries before and after adjustment for individual characteristics, and correlates of outcomes varied by country.

Conclusions: everal modifiable risk and protective factors for family member psychological outcomes were identified in this study. Diabetes education and social support were associated with improved outcomes, especially if they were helpful in supporting people with diabetes
0742-3071
Kovacs Burns, K.
1ea99da5-2256-4546-935b-cdefe91bd13d
Holt, Richard
d54202e1-fcf6-4a17-a320-9f32d7024393
Nicolucci, A.
471a96a2-875e-418c-93be-dccda1c68fda
Lucisano, G.
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Skovlund, S.E.
61d3307b-56be-46fa-a61b-27731f5ab322
Comaschi, M.
3e9dd2f3-eaa0-40b0-b723-6389082e662b
Vallis, M.
27aa2932-45b7-40ee-a232-f4921a9cb2ea
Peyrot, M.
e773c78e-410d-4913-86ff-5c91f4d6258a
Kovacs Burns, K.
1ea99da5-2256-4546-935b-cdefe91bd13d
Holt, Richard
d54202e1-fcf6-4a17-a320-9f32d7024393
Nicolucci, A.
471a96a2-875e-418c-93be-dccda1c68fda
Lucisano, G.
8d239f1b-9400-4e0d-9a11-1e33715bb002
Skovlund, S.E.
61d3307b-56be-46fa-a61b-27731f5ab322
Comaschi, M.
3e9dd2f3-eaa0-40b0-b723-6389082e662b
Vallis, M.
27aa2932-45b7-40ee-a232-f4921a9cb2ea
Peyrot, M.
e773c78e-410d-4913-86ff-5c91f4d6258a

Kovacs Burns, K., Holt, Richard, Nicolucci, A., Lucisano, G., Skovlund, S.E., Comaschi, M., Vallis, M. and Peyrot, M. (2016) Correlates of psychological outcomes among family members of people with diabetes in the second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™ ) study. Diabetic Medicine. (doi:10.1111/dme.13136). (PMID:27086909)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aims: to conduct a second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2™) study, examining the experiences of family members caring for adults with diabetes in order to identify correlates of family member psychological outcomes (generic psychological well-being, perceived quality of life, and diabetes-related burden, impact and distress).

Methods: a total of 2057 family members living with a person with diabetes and involved in their care participated in an online, telephone or in-person survey. Samples of 120 respondents were recruited in each of 17 countries. Significant (P<0.05) correlates of psychological outcomes were identified by multi-level multiple regression.

Results: outcomes were worse for family members not working because of diabetes or those who had other competing obligations. Outcomes were worse if the person with diabetes was not a partner or parent, used injected diabetes medication, or had more frequent hypoglycaemia. Outcomes were worse for family members who believed that diabetes was more severe, were more involved in diabetes care, had more conflict over diabetes care or were frustrated about not knowing how to help the person with diabetes. Outcomes were better for those who had greater support from others and felt they found good ways to help the person with diabetes. There were significant differences in outcomes among countries before and after adjustment for individual characteristics, and correlates of outcomes varied by country.

Conclusions: everal modifiable risk and protective factors for family member psychological outcomes were identified in this study. Diabetes education and social support were associated with improved outcomes, especially if they were helpful in supporting people with diabetes

Text
DAWN2 HCP Correlates_DME 2015-0078r1_Resubmission_18Jan2016.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 11 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 May 2016
Published date: September 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 394704
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/394704
ISSN: 0742-3071
PURE UUID: 00e5e484-0245-49e4-a46c-3d3c4c12b1c4
ORCID for Richard Holt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8911-6744

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Date deposited: 20 May 2016 10:22
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:56

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