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Positive emotional style and subjective, cardiovascular and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress

Positive emotional style and subjective, cardiovascular and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress
Positive emotional style and subjective, cardiovascular and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress

The relationships between positive emotional style and acute salivary cortisol and cardiovascular responses to laboratory stress tasks were examined in 40 young women (mean age=28.8 years). Positive emotional style (PES) was measured by aggregating daily positive mood rating scales over one week. Negative affect was assessed with the short form Profile of Mood States. Salivary cortisol was measured in response to two behavioural tasks, a 5 min speech task and a 5 min mirror tracing task. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate responses were monitored using a Finometer during baseline, tasks and recovery. Higher PES was associated with more complete diastolic BP recovery (p=0.027) and lower acute cortisol response to stress (p=0.018), after adjusting for baseline measures, age, BMI and negative affect. Individuals with higher PES reported lower subjective tension during the tasks and perceived the tasks as more controllable. There were no differences in ratings of task involvement or in objective measures of task performance. A retrospective measure of positive affect (POMS vigour) was associated with diastolic BP recovery but not cortisol responses or subjective tension. The findings suggest that positive affective traits, assessed using repeated assessments of daily mood, are related to adaptive recovery from acute psychological stress. Our results reinforce evidence linking positive affect with adaptive diastolic BP recovery, while extending the results to cortisol. Investigations into the biological correlates of affective traits should consider utilising repeated measures of experienced affect.
0306-4530
1175-1183
Bostock, Sophie
5d66bf73-84c2-4c79-bd07-f335f03e8931
Hamer, Mark
48304c2d-0ae4-4bd5-92ee-9833d933244c
Wawrzyniak, Andrew
0218770d-3105-45b5-b566-cedf3d58ed48
Mitchell, Ellen
830022e0-e325-464c-9a72-cb91657f4cde
Steptoe, Andrew
aadc4799-ddd7-4013-a8c9-c37ec87f23c3
Bostock, Sophie
5d66bf73-84c2-4c79-bd07-f335f03e8931
Hamer, Mark
48304c2d-0ae4-4bd5-92ee-9833d933244c
Wawrzyniak, Andrew
0218770d-3105-45b5-b566-cedf3d58ed48
Mitchell, Ellen
830022e0-e325-464c-9a72-cb91657f4cde
Steptoe, Andrew
aadc4799-ddd7-4013-a8c9-c37ec87f23c3

Bostock, Sophie, Hamer, Mark, Wawrzyniak, Andrew, Mitchell, Ellen and Steptoe, Andrew (2011) Positive emotional style and subjective, cardiovascular and cortisol responses to acute laboratory stress. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 36 (8), 1175-1183. (doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2011.02.009). (PMID:21398040)

Record type: Article

Abstract


The relationships between positive emotional style and acute salivary cortisol and cardiovascular responses to laboratory stress tasks were examined in 40 young women (mean age=28.8 years). Positive emotional style (PES) was measured by aggregating daily positive mood rating scales over one week. Negative affect was assessed with the short form Profile of Mood States. Salivary cortisol was measured in response to two behavioural tasks, a 5 min speech task and a 5 min mirror tracing task. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate responses were monitored using a Finometer during baseline, tasks and recovery. Higher PES was associated with more complete diastolic BP recovery (p=0.027) and lower acute cortisol response to stress (p=0.018), after adjusting for baseline measures, age, BMI and negative affect. Individuals with higher PES reported lower subjective tension during the tasks and perceived the tasks as more controllable. There were no differences in ratings of task involvement or in objective measures of task performance. A retrospective measure of positive affect (POMS vigour) was associated with diastolic BP recovery but not cortisol responses or subjective tension. The findings suggest that positive affective traits, assessed using repeated assessments of daily mood, are related to adaptive recovery from acute psychological stress. Our results reinforce evidence linking positive affect with adaptive diastolic BP recovery, while extending the results to cortisol. Investigations into the biological correlates of affective traits should consider utilising repeated measures of experienced affect.

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Accepted/In Press date: 14 February 2011
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 March 2011
Published date: September 2011
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 396014
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396014
ISSN: 0306-4530
PURE UUID: 9c1ce4cf-dcbe-4694-bd50-d9cd56d01b9b

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Date deposited: 14 Jul 2016 15:42
Last modified: 28 Oct 2019 20:12

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