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Objectively assessed sedentary time and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case–control study

Objectively assessed sedentary time and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case–control study
Objectively assessed sedentary time and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case–control study
There is some evidence to suggest detrimental, linear associations between objectively assessed sedentary time and various metabolic risk factors [1, 2], although it remains unclear if these associations are independent of moderate to vigorous physical activity [3, 4]. The effects of sedentary behaviour on health might be more apparent in clinical populations and the elderly, although the majority of research in this area has been conducted in healthy partici- pants, which might partly explain inconsistencies in the find- ings. Thus, translation into specific clinical populations is needed. If a reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus can be achieved by rectifying the imbalance between sitting time and light-intensity (‘lifestyle’) activity, this would have im- portant implications for early intervention and treatment. The aim of this study was to compare objectively assessed levels of sedentary and physical activity in type 2 diabetic patients and age matched healthy controls.
0012-186X
2761-2762
Hamer, Mark
48304c2d-0ae4-4bd5-92ee-9833d933244c
Bostock, Sophie
5d66bf73-84c2-4c79-bd07-f335f03e8931
Hackett, Ruth
85636779-e303-4c6a-b22f-296e9c7fcf23
Steptoe, Andrew
aadc4799-ddd7-4013-a8c9-c37ec87f23c3
Hamer, Mark
48304c2d-0ae4-4bd5-92ee-9833d933244c
Bostock, Sophie
5d66bf73-84c2-4c79-bd07-f335f03e8931
Hackett, Ruth
85636779-e303-4c6a-b22f-296e9c7fcf23
Steptoe, Andrew
aadc4799-ddd7-4013-a8c9-c37ec87f23c3

Hamer, Mark, Bostock, Sophie, Hackett, Ruth and Steptoe, Andrew (2013) Objectively assessed sedentary time and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case–control study. Diabetologia, 56 (12), 2761-2762. (doi:10.1007/s00125-013-3051-5). (PMID:24078056)

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is some evidence to suggest detrimental, linear associations between objectively assessed sedentary time and various metabolic risk factors [1, 2], although it remains unclear if these associations are independent of moderate to vigorous physical activity [3, 4]. The effects of sedentary behaviour on health might be more apparent in clinical populations and the elderly, although the majority of research in this area has been conducted in healthy partici- pants, which might partly explain inconsistencies in the find- ings. Thus, translation into specific clinical populations is needed. If a reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus can be achieved by rectifying the imbalance between sitting time and light-intensity (‘lifestyle’) activity, this would have im- portant implications for early intervention and treatment. The aim of this study was to compare objectively assessed levels of sedentary and physical activity in type 2 diabetic patients and age matched healthy controls.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 27 September 2013
Published date: December 2013
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 396017
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/396017
ISSN: 0012-186X
PURE UUID: 09c46140-7995-4e9c-a61f-0583ef782e57

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Date deposited: 14 Jul 2016 15:49
Last modified: 04 Nov 2019 19:48

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