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Taste preference, food neophobia and nutritional intake in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet: a prospective study

Taste preference, food neophobia and nutritional intake in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet: a prospective study
Taste preference, food neophobia and nutritional intake in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet: a prospective study
BACKGROUND:Taste exposure in infancy is known to predict food preferences later in childhood. This is particularly relevant in children with cows' milk allergy who consume a substitute formula and/or a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet early in life. This prospective study aimed to show whether there is a long-term effect of consuming a substitute formula and CME diet on taste preferences and dietary intake.METHODS:Children were predominantly recruited from two large birth cohort studies in the UK. Two groups were recruited: an experimental group of children who had consumed a CME diet during infancy and a control group who had consumed an unrestricted diet during infancy. Parents completed a food neophobia questionnaire and an estimated prospective food diary. Children completed a taste preference test and their growth was assessed.RESULTS:One hundred and one children with a mean age of 11.5 years were recruited (28 CME and 73 controls). Children in the CME group had a significantly higher preference for bitter taste than those in the control group (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between the groups with respect to the intake of some micronutrients, including riboflavin, iodine, sodium and selenium. Food neophobia did not differ between groups. Some 28% of the CME group were overweight/obese compared to 15% of the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant.CONCLUSIONS:Consuming a substitute formula and/or a CME diet in infancy has a long-term effect on the preference for bitter taste. Differences exist with respect to the intake of some micronutrients, but not macronutrients. There was a nonsignificant trend towards being overweight and obese in children in the CME group.
0952-3871
786-796
Maslin, K.
bee9c089-a500-4767-95ab-55421b02ca50
Grimshaw, Kate
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Oliver, E.
cb292c1c-fbcf-4742-99af-46160bafc792
Roberts, G.
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Arshad, S.H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Dean, T.
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Grundy, J.
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Glasbey, G.
e1ce107b-96ac-4990-aecd-4ec55227ebf8
Venter, C.
aaf31576-d0ee-49d7-93aa-e7bc0a18f31a
Maslin, K.
bee9c089-a500-4767-95ab-55421b02ca50
Grimshaw, Kate
766b6cf0-347a-447d-aeab-f07366f8ce28
Oliver, E.
cb292c1c-fbcf-4742-99af-46160bafc792
Roberts, G.
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Arshad, S.H.
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Dean, T.
4a68a12c-bf67-4157-87c9-71e1ea6c94db
Grundy, J.
6a4aac31-2aeb-4f17-9848-9b88dd2f2c74
Glasbey, G.
e1ce107b-96ac-4990-aecd-4ec55227ebf8
Venter, C.
aaf31576-d0ee-49d7-93aa-e7bc0a18f31a

Maslin, K., Grimshaw, Kate, Oliver, E., Roberts, G., Arshad, S.H., Dean, T., Grundy, J., Glasbey, G. and Venter, C. (2016) Taste preference, food neophobia and nutritional intake in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet: a prospective study. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 29 (6), 786-796. (doi:10.1111/jhn.12387). (PMID:27298213)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND:Taste exposure in infancy is known to predict food preferences later in childhood. This is particularly relevant in children with cows' milk allergy who consume a substitute formula and/or a cows' milk exclusion (CME) diet early in life. This prospective study aimed to show whether there is a long-term effect of consuming a substitute formula and CME diet on taste preferences and dietary intake.METHODS:Children were predominantly recruited from two large birth cohort studies in the UK. Two groups were recruited: an experimental group of children who had consumed a CME diet during infancy and a control group who had consumed an unrestricted diet during infancy. Parents completed a food neophobia questionnaire and an estimated prospective food diary. Children completed a taste preference test and their growth was assessed.RESULTS:One hundred and one children with a mean age of 11.5 years were recruited (28 CME and 73 controls). Children in the CME group had a significantly higher preference for bitter taste than those in the control group (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between the groups with respect to the intake of some micronutrients, including riboflavin, iodine, sodium and selenium. Food neophobia did not differ between groups. Some 28% of the CME group were overweight/obese compared to 15% of the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant.CONCLUSIONS:Consuming a substitute formula and/or a CME diet in infancy has a long-term effect on the preference for bitter taste. Differences exist with respect to the intake of some micronutrients, but not macronutrients. There was a nonsignificant trend towards being overweight and obese in children in the CME group.

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13th April ACCEPTED version taste preference main document incl figures and tables.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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Maslin_et_al-2016-Journal_of_Human_Nutrition_and_Dietetics Taste preference food neophobia and nutritional intake in children consuming a cows' milk exclusion diet a prospective study.
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Accepted/In Press date: 13 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 June 2016
Published date: December 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health

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Local EPrints ID: 397837
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/397837
ISSN: 0952-3871
PURE UUID: 95aded2b-df97-4b3d-87ba-96db0d4a618b
ORCID for G. Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

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Date deposited: 07 Jul 2016 12:42
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:04

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