The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Activity patterns in response to symptoms in patients being treated for chronic fatigue syndrome: an experience sampling methodology study

Activity patterns in response to symptoms in patients being treated for chronic fatigue syndrome: an experience sampling methodology study
Activity patterns in response to symptoms in patients being treated for chronic fatigue syndrome: an experience sampling methodology study
Objective: Cognitive–behavioral models of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) propose that patients respond to symptoms with 2 predominant activity patterns—activity limitation and all-or-nothing behaviors—both of which may contribute to illness persistence. The current study investigated whether activity patterns occurred at the same time as, or followed on from, patient symptom experience and affect.

Method: Twenty-three adults with CFS were recruited from U.K. CFS services. Experience sampling methodology (ESM) was used to assess fluctuations in patient symptom experience, affect, and activity management patterns over 10 assessments per day for a total of 6 days. Assessments were conducted within patients’ daily life and were delivered through an app on touchscreen Android mobile phones. Multilevel model analyses were conducted to examine the role of self-reported patient fatigue, pain, and affect as predictors of change in activity patterns at the same and subsequent assessment.

Results: Current experience of fatigue-related symptoms and pain predicted higher patient activity limitation at the current and subsequent assessments whereas subjective wellness predicted higher all-or-nothing behavior at both times. Current pain predicted less all-or-nothing behavior at the subsequent assessment. In contrast to hypotheses, current positive affect was predictive of current activity limitation whereas current negative affect was predictive of current all-or-nothing behavior. Both activity patterns varied at the momentary level.

Conclusions: Patient symptom experiences appear to be driving patient activity management patterns in line with the cognitive–behavioral model of CFS. ESM offers a useful method for examining multiple interacting variables within the context of patients’ daily life.
0278-6133
264-269
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Barrowlcough, Christine
ba2d361c-e267-4c84-9fc4-0476368f8cf5
Caldwell, Kim
177eb569-7b3d-4fa5-9118-930ad9714aac
Emsley, Richard
befe7b94-728c-47aa-84db-4f066d5f4836
Wearden, Alison
57425d54-35b4-450e-8deb-ab18cd7016dc
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Barrowlcough, Christine
ba2d361c-e267-4c84-9fc4-0476368f8cf5
Caldwell, Kim
177eb569-7b3d-4fa5-9118-930ad9714aac
Emsley, Richard
befe7b94-728c-47aa-84db-4f066d5f4836
Wearden, Alison
57425d54-35b4-450e-8deb-ab18cd7016dc

Band, Rebecca, Barrowlcough, Christine, Caldwell, Kim, Emsley, Richard and Wearden, Alison (2017) Activity patterns in response to symptoms in patients being treated for chronic fatigue syndrome: an experience sampling methodology study. Health Psychology, 36 (3), 264-269. (doi:10.1037/hea0000422).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Cognitive–behavioral models of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) propose that patients respond to symptoms with 2 predominant activity patterns—activity limitation and all-or-nothing behaviors—both of which may contribute to illness persistence. The current study investigated whether activity patterns occurred at the same time as, or followed on from, patient symptom experience and affect.

Method: Twenty-three adults with CFS were recruited from U.K. CFS services. Experience sampling methodology (ESM) was used to assess fluctuations in patient symptom experience, affect, and activity management patterns over 10 assessments per day for a total of 6 days. Assessments were conducted within patients’ daily life and were delivered through an app on touchscreen Android mobile phones. Multilevel model analyses were conducted to examine the role of self-reported patient fatigue, pain, and affect as predictors of change in activity patterns at the same and subsequent assessment.

Results: Current experience of fatigue-related symptoms and pain predicted higher patient activity limitation at the current and subsequent assessments whereas subjective wellness predicted higher all-or-nothing behavior at both times. Current pain predicted less all-or-nothing behavior at the subsequent assessment. In contrast to hypotheses, current positive affect was predictive of current activity limitation whereas current negative affect was predictive of current all-or-nothing behavior. Both activity patterns varied at the momentary level.

Conclusions: Patient symptom experiences appear to be driving patient activity management patterns in line with the cognitive–behavioral model of CFS. ESM offers a useful method for examining multiple interacting variables within the context of patients’ daily life.

Text
HEA-2015-2819 R3.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Download (87kB)
Text
Activity management in CFS accepted version.doc - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: March 2017
Published date: 2017
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 398365
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/398365
ISSN: 0278-6133
PURE UUID: 63dcd140-e6d4-4898-b66c-e70aca8463d3
ORCID for Rebecca Band: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5403-1708

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jul 2016 09:22
Last modified: 18 Jul 2020 00:34

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×