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Combined cognitive biases for pain and disability information in individuals with chronic headache: a preliminary investigation

Combined cognitive biases for pain and disability information in individuals with chronic headache: a preliminary investigation
Combined cognitive biases for pain and disability information in individuals with chronic headache: a preliminary investigation
Pain-related cognitive biases have been demonstrated in chronic pain patients, yet despite theoretical predictions are rarely investigated in combination. Combined cognitive biases were explored in individuals with chronic headache (n = 17) and pain-free controls (n = 20). Participants completed spatial cueing (attentional bias), sentence generation (interpretation bias) and free recall tasks (memory bias), with ambiguous sensory-pain, disability and neutral words. Individuals with chronic headache, relative to controls, showed significantly greater interpretation and memory biases favouring ambiguous sensory-pain words and interpretation bias favouring ambiguous disability words. No attentional bias was found. Further research is needed exploring the temporal pattern of cognitive biases.
pain, chronic illness, cognitive processing, health psychology, quantitative methods
1461-7277
1610-1621
Schoth, Daniel
73f3036e-b8cb-40b2-9466-e8e0f341fdd5
Parry, Laura
f3b060dd-7b72-4693-8108-bd33b715d861
Liossi, Christina
fd401ad6-581a-4a31-a60b-f8671ffd3558
Schoth, Daniel
73f3036e-b8cb-40b2-9466-e8e0f341fdd5
Parry, Laura
f3b060dd-7b72-4693-8108-bd33b715d861
Liossi, Christina
fd401ad6-581a-4a31-a60b-f8671ffd3558

Schoth, Daniel, Parry, Laura and Liossi, Christina (2018) Combined cognitive biases for pain and disability information in individuals with chronic headache: a preliminary investigation. Journal of Health Psychology, 23 (12), 1610-1621. (doi:10.1177/1359105316664136).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Pain-related cognitive biases have been demonstrated in chronic pain patients, yet despite theoretical predictions are rarely investigated in combination. Combined cognitive biases were explored in individuals with chronic headache (n = 17) and pain-free controls (n = 20). Participants completed spatial cueing (attentional bias), sentence generation (interpretation bias) and free recall tasks (memory bias), with ambiguous sensory-pain, disability and neutral words. Individuals with chronic headache, relative to controls, showed significantly greater interpretation and memory biases favouring ambiguous sensory-pain words and interpretation bias favouring ambiguous disability words. No attentional bias was found. Further research is needed exploring the temporal pattern of cognitive biases.

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CCB Headache Manuscript 15-06-16 UNMASKED repository.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 July 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 August 2016
Published date: 1 October 2018
Keywords: pain, chronic illness, cognitive processing, health psychology, quantitative methods
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399200
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399200
ISSN: 1461-7277
PURE UUID: 626f79bf-255a-46aa-bf52-e8001af80ecf
ORCID for Christina Liossi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0627-6377

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Aug 2016 14:37
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:30

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Contributors

Author: Daniel Schoth
Author: Laura Parry

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