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Seeking security: gay labour migration and uneven landscapes of work

Seeking security: gay labour migration and uneven landscapes of work
Seeking security: gay labour migration and uneven landscapes of work
Previous research has understood the migrations of gay men and other queer people through a lens of identity development, whereby relocation is driven by processes of coming out and consuming particular urban amenities. Meanwhile, labour geographers have largely overlooked sexuality, seeking to understand work-related migration in relation to gender, race, citizenship and the collective organization of workers. Drawing on the migration narratives of gay-identified men living in Ottawa, Canada, and Washington, DC, USA, we argue that the norms governing gender and sexuality within various workplaces, economic sectors and locales continuously influence migration related to work and inextricably linked processes of social reproduction. In particular, we explain how the affective needs of gay workers both deflect them from and attract them to particular locales and workplaces. In their migration destinations, gay workers tend to also transform the norms of social reproduction within workplaces and sectors. While gay workers may use migration to successfully negotiate the uneven landscapes of inclusion and visibility in North America, their agency is also constrained by the ongoing of regulation of sexuality in both workplaces and social and community environments.
0308-518X
2484-2503
Lewis, Nathaniel M.
f0218afb-51ea-4141-a1e9-d031d8b98645
Mills, Suzanne
f0031b99-242c-4b19-86cc-d555918ac617
Lewis, Nathaniel M.
f0218afb-51ea-4141-a1e9-d031d8b98645
Mills, Suzanne
f0031b99-242c-4b19-86cc-d555918ac617

Lewis, Nathaniel M. and Mills, Suzanne (2016) Seeking security: gay labour migration and uneven landscapes of work. Environment and Planning A, 48 (12), 2484-2503. (doi:10.1177/0308518X16659773).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous research has understood the migrations of gay men and other queer people through a lens of identity development, whereby relocation is driven by processes of coming out and consuming particular urban amenities. Meanwhile, labour geographers have largely overlooked sexuality, seeking to understand work-related migration in relation to gender, race, citizenship and the collective organization of workers. Drawing on the migration narratives of gay-identified men living in Ottawa, Canada, and Washington, DC, USA, we argue that the norms governing gender and sexuality within various workplaces, economic sectors and locales continuously influence migration related to work and inextricably linked processes of social reproduction. In particular, we explain how the affective needs of gay workers both deflect them from and attract them to particular locales and workplaces. In their migration destinations, gay workers tend to also transform the norms of social reproduction within workplaces and sectors. While gay workers may use migration to successfully negotiate the uneven landscapes of inclusion and visibility in North America, their agency is also constrained by the ongoing of regulation of sexuality in both workplaces and social and community environments.

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Accepted/In Press date: 26 June 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 August 2016
Published date: August 2016
Organisations: Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 399741
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/399741
ISSN: 0308-518X
PURE UUID: 26d1c2f7-91ca-41be-b286-07f8685a04b8

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Date deposited: 25 Aug 2016 10:57
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 18:10

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Author: Suzanne Mills

University divisions

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