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Henry V and the administration of justice: the surrender of Meaux (May 1422)

Henry V and the administration of justice: the surrender of Meaux (May 1422)
Henry V and the administration of justice: the surrender of Meaux (May 1422)
Where did Henry V get his reputation as a ‘paragon of justice’? It is mainly conveyed to us by French chroniclers, and it is therefore necessary to investigate its origins in the French kingdom. This study focuses on Henry’s administration of justice at the surrender of the town and the Market of Meaux. The stout resistance of the besieged was punished harshly. It was a robust response to an obvious breach of the tacit code of honour. The heroic conduct of the defenders, especially the Bâtard de Vaurus, is a later historiographical construction. Uniquely, Henry V ordered the trial and execution of four ‘hardened criminals’ on the grounds of lese-majesty. This sent a strong signal to the king’s enemies. No one should defy his authority as heir to the throne of France. And no one, not even a nobleman, could terrorise the population with impunity.
0304-4181
74-88
Ambuhl, Remy
32df8780-6465-4f04-b366-55faede4730d
Ambuhl, Remy
32df8780-6465-4f04-b366-55faede4730d

Ambuhl, Remy (2017) Henry V and the administration of justice: the surrender of Meaux (May 1422) Journal of Medieval History, 43, (1), pp. 74-88.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Where did Henry V get his reputation as a ‘paragon of justice’? It is mainly conveyed to us by French chroniclers, and it is therefore necessary to investigate its origins in the French kingdom. This study focuses on Henry’s administration of justice at the surrender of the town and the Market of Meaux. The stout resistance of the besieged was punished harshly. It was a robust response to an obvious breach of the tacit code of honour. The heroic conduct of the defenders, especially the Bâtard de Vaurus, is a later historiographical construction. Uniquely, Henry V ordered the trial and execution of four ‘hardened criminals’ on the grounds of lese-majesty. This sent a strong signal to the king’s enemies. No one should defy his authority as heir to the throne of France. And no one, not even a nobleman, could terrorise the population with impunity.

Other CWAmbuhl rev5.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 30 May 2018.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 October 2016
Published date: 1 February 2017
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400142
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400142
ISSN: 0304-4181
PURE UUID: ad1109bc-23f7-418c-a915-fef89a930411

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Date deposited: 12 Sep 2016 08:34
Last modified: 24 Oct 2017 20:12

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Contributors

Author: Remy Ambuhl

University divisions

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