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Modified constraint-induced movement therapy as a home-based intervention for children with cerebral palsy

Modified constraint-induced movement therapy as a home-based intervention for children with cerebral palsy
Modified constraint-induced movement therapy as a home-based intervention for children with cerebral palsy
Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the benefit to upper limb function of a home-based version of pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy, which was delivered across 2 months.

Methods: Nine children (mean age: 6 years, 9 months) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy participated in this A1-B-C-A2 design, where A1 and A2 were nonintervention phases. In phases B and C, participants wore a splint on the unaffected hand. In phase C, motivating feedback through a computer game was added.

Results: The Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function and the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test scores were significantly higher at the end of phases B (P = .037 and P = .006, respectively) and C (P = .001 and P = .001, respectively). Melbourne scores remained higher at the end of phase A2 (P = .001).

Conclusions: A nonintensive form of home-based constraint-induced movement therapy was found to be effective. Improvements were larger after the second month of intervention.
0898-5669
154-160
Psychouli, Pavlina
46f17c61-f419-440e-b89e-501abd293303
Kennedy, Colin R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93
Psychouli, Pavlina
46f17c61-f419-440e-b89e-501abd293303
Kennedy, Colin R.
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93

Psychouli, Pavlina and Kennedy, Colin R. (2016) Modified constraint-induced movement therapy as a home-based intervention for children with cerebral palsy. Pediatric Physical Therapy, 28 (2), Summer Issue, 154-160. (doi:10.1097/PEP.0000000000000227). (PMID:26808960)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the benefit to upper limb function of a home-based version of pediatric constraint-induced movement therapy, which was delivered across 2 months.

Methods: Nine children (mean age: 6 years, 9 months) with hemiplegic cerebral palsy participated in this A1-B-C-A2 design, where A1 and A2 were nonintervention phases. In phases B and C, participants wore a splint on the unaffected hand. In phase C, motivating feedback through a computer game was added.

Results: The Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function and the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test scores were significantly higher at the end of phases B (P = .037 and P = .006, respectively) and C (P = .001 and P = .001, respectively). Melbourne scores remained higher at the end of phase A2 (P = .001).

Conclusions: A nonintensive form of home-based constraint-induced movement therapy was found to be effective. Improvements were larger after the second month of intervention.

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Accepted/In Press date: 20 May 2016
Published date: July 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400190
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400190
ISSN: 0898-5669
PURE UUID: 6e907246-7575-4a24-8654-09f6ea422fda

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Date deposited: 13 Sep 2016 08:26
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 06:33

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Author: Pavlina Psychouli

University divisions

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