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Analysis of seasonal risk for importation of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitate (Diptera: Tephritidae), via air passenger traffic arriving in Florida and California

Analysis of seasonal risk for importation of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitate (Diptera: Tephritidae), via air passenger traffic arriving in Florida and California
Analysis of seasonal risk for importation of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitate (Diptera: Tephritidae), via air passenger traffic arriving in Florida and California
The Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), is one of the most economically damaging pests in the world and has repeatedly invaded two major agricultural states in the United States, Florida and California, each time requiring costly eradication. The Mediterranean fruit fly gains entry primarily in infested fruit carried by airline passengers and, since Florida and California each receive about 13 million international passengers annually, the risk of Mediterranean fruit fly entering the United States is potentially very high. The risk of passengers bringing the pest into Florida or California from Mediterranean fruit fly-infested countries was determined with two novel models, one estimated seasonal variation in airline passenger number and the other defined the seasonal and spatial variability in Mediterranean fruit fly abundance. These models elucidated relationships among the risk factors for Mediterranean fruit fly introduction, such as amount of passenger traffic, routes traveled, season of travel, abundance of Mediterranean fruit fly in countries where flights departed, and risk of the pest arriving at destination airports. The risk of Mediterranean fruit fly being introduced into Florida was greatest from Colombia, Brazil, Panama, Venezuela, Argentina, and Ecuador during January–August, whereas primarily the risk to California was from Brazil, Panama, Colombia, and Italy in May–August. About three times more Mediterranean fruit flies were intercepted in passenger baggage at airports in Florida than California, although the data were compromised by a lack of systematic sampling and other limitations. Nevertheless, this study achieved the goal of analyzing available data on seasonal passenger flow and Mediterranean fruit fly population levels to determine when surveillance should be intensified at key airports in Florida and California.
1-12
Szyniszewska, A.M.
7f6e160d-ee81-4610-9ea0-f673be2a0667
Leppla, N.C.
2642e6e4-22da-4019-a1e2-c21fdc2903f4
Huang, Z.
53784719-9851-4084-872c-82df9590420f
Tatem, A.J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Szyniszewska, A.M.
7f6e160d-ee81-4610-9ea0-f673be2a0667
Leppla, N.C.
2642e6e4-22da-4019-a1e2-c21fdc2903f4
Huang, Z.
53784719-9851-4084-872c-82df9590420f
Tatem, A.J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e

Szyniszewska, A.M., Leppla, N.C., Huang, Z. and Tatem, A.J. (2016) Analysis of seasonal risk for importation of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitate (Diptera: Tephritidae), via air passenger traffic arriving in Florida and California. Journal of Economic Entomology, 1-12. (doi:10.1093/jee/tow196).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), is one of the most economically damaging pests in the world and has repeatedly invaded two major agricultural states in the United States, Florida and California, each time requiring costly eradication. The Mediterranean fruit fly gains entry primarily in infested fruit carried by airline passengers and, since Florida and California each receive about 13 million international passengers annually, the risk of Mediterranean fruit fly entering the United States is potentially very high. The risk of passengers bringing the pest into Florida or California from Mediterranean fruit fly-infested countries was determined with two novel models, one estimated seasonal variation in airline passenger number and the other defined the seasonal and spatial variability in Mediterranean fruit fly abundance. These models elucidated relationships among the risk factors for Mediterranean fruit fly introduction, such as amount of passenger traffic, routes traveled, season of travel, abundance of Mediterranean fruit fly in countries where flights departed, and risk of the pest arriving at destination airports. The risk of Mediterranean fruit fly being introduced into Florida was greatest from Colombia, Brazil, Panama, Venezuela, Argentina, and Ecuador during January–August, whereas primarily the risk to California was from Brazil, Panama, Colombia, and Italy in May–August. About three times more Mediterranean fruit flies were intercepted in passenger baggage at airports in Florida than California, although the data were compromised by a lack of systematic sampling and other limitations. Nevertheless, this study achieved the goal of analyzing available data on seasonal passenger flow and Mediterranean fruit fly population levels to determine when surveillance should be intensified at key airports in Florida and California.

Text
Szyniszewska et al._Medfly_Passenger_Pathways_052716.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 September 2016
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation, WorldPop, Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 400350
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/400350
PURE UUID: 7151dec6-fe32-4d71-8b04-2bada55474e2
ORCID for A.J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Sep 2016 15:38
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:36

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