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All cause mortality and body mass index in a young Asian occupational cohort without baseline metabolic syndrome components

All cause mortality and body mass index in a young Asian occupational cohort without baseline metabolic syndrome components
All cause mortality and body mass index in a young Asian occupational cohort without baseline metabolic syndrome components
Background: The aim was to investigate associations between underweight, overweight and obesity and all cause, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, excluding subjects with known CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) at baseline.

Methods: The study population consisted of examinees participating in a health screening in Korea from 2002 to 2013. Data were analyzed in 162,194 subjects (in a retrospective cohort study design-median (interquartile range (IQR) follow-up 4.9 (1.8–8.5 years))). The outcomes were all cause mortality, cancer and CVD.

Results: The mean (age range) and median age (IQR) at baseline were 36.9(20.0–85.3) and 35.2 (30.8–40.6) years. There were 436 deaths during follow-up. For men and women together, the fully adjusted HR for underweight and all cause mortality, cancer and CVD was 1.53 (95% CIs 1.06–2.20), 1.21 (95% CIs 0.68–2.14) and 1.34 (95% CIs 0.40–4.49) respectively. In contrast, the fully adjusted HR for overweight/obesity combined and all cause mortality was 0.77 (95%CIs 0.63–0.95) and there were non significant trends towards decreased cancer and CVD mortality. The association between overweight/obesity and all cause mortality was similar for men and women considered separately and for overweight and obesity as separate BMI categories. Smoking did not seem to explain the increased HR in the underweight BMI category.

Conclusions: In a young metabolically healthy adult cohort, underweight was associated with increased all cause mortality and overweight/obesity was associated with decreased all cause mortality if CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are excluded.
0167-5273
271-278
Sung, K.-C.
fd4c087c-3466-4c9a-aa95-cb1f07ad8e56
Ryu, S.
c2eb4ab3-d9ea-49c4-846c-49afe538a376
Lee, J.-Y.
c59195e4-4d68-4cec-8261-87be0eb5260d
Lee, S.
5c554804-da3a-4842-a78a-94a77c0bbe6b
Cheong, E.
d2016940-cc04-40d2-93c7-d78f1c4b7bf5
Kim, J.-Y.
12de8349-d34d-4577-9ac2-541ea8b70986
Wild, S.H.
eb23a87e-b8da-4f3f-8dab-e02e7b5104aa
Byrne, C.D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Sung, K.-C.
fd4c087c-3466-4c9a-aa95-cb1f07ad8e56
Ryu, S.
c2eb4ab3-d9ea-49c4-846c-49afe538a376
Lee, J.-Y.
c59195e4-4d68-4cec-8261-87be0eb5260d
Lee, S.
5c554804-da3a-4842-a78a-94a77c0bbe6b
Cheong, E.
d2016940-cc04-40d2-93c7-d78f1c4b7bf5
Kim, J.-Y.
12de8349-d34d-4577-9ac2-541ea8b70986
Wild, S.H.
eb23a87e-b8da-4f3f-8dab-e02e7b5104aa
Byrne, C.D.
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c

Sung, K.-C., Ryu, S., Lee, J.-Y., Lee, S., Cheong, E., Kim, J.-Y., Wild, S.H. and Byrne, C.D. (2016) All cause mortality and body mass index in a young Asian occupational cohort without baseline metabolic syndrome components. International Journal of Cardiology, 224, 271-278. (doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.09.056). (PMID:27665397)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The aim was to investigate associations between underweight, overweight and obesity and all cause, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, excluding subjects with known CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) at baseline.

Methods: The study population consisted of examinees participating in a health screening in Korea from 2002 to 2013. Data were analyzed in 162,194 subjects (in a retrospective cohort study design-median (interquartile range (IQR) follow-up 4.9 (1.8–8.5 years))). The outcomes were all cause mortality, cancer and CVD.

Results: The mean (age range) and median age (IQR) at baseline were 36.9(20.0–85.3) and 35.2 (30.8–40.6) years. There were 436 deaths during follow-up. For men and women together, the fully adjusted HR for underweight and all cause mortality, cancer and CVD was 1.53 (95% CIs 1.06–2.20), 1.21 (95% CIs 0.68–2.14) and 1.34 (95% CIs 0.40–4.49) respectively. In contrast, the fully adjusted HR for overweight/obesity combined and all cause mortality was 0.77 (95%CIs 0.63–0.95) and there were non significant trends towards decreased cancer and CVD mortality. The association between overweight/obesity and all cause mortality was similar for men and women considered separately and for overweight and obesity as separate BMI categories. Smoking did not seem to explain the increased HR in the underweight BMI category.

Conclusions: In a young metabolically healthy adult cohort, underweight was associated with increased all cause mortality and overweight/obesity was associated with decreased all cause mortality if CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are excluded.

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__soton.ac.uk_ude_PersonalFiles_Users_lce_mydocuments_Eprints - Prof Byrne_Accepted pubs for Eprints_Int J Cardiol_Sept 2016_Sung K_Byrne CD_IJC-D-16-03228_R1_international j of cardiology_20160825(1).pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 September 2016
Published date: 1 December 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401217
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401217
ISSN: 0167-5273
PURE UUID: 4d8622e0-73b1-4c5a-b52a-d1741d18536e
ORCID for C.D. Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753

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Date deposited: 10 Oct 2016 15:33
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:03

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