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Distribution of short-finned squid Illex argentinus (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) inferred from the diets of Southern Ocean albatrosses using stable isotope analyses

Distribution of short-finned squid Illex argentinus (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) inferred from the diets of Southern Ocean albatrosses using stable isotope analyses
Distribution of short-finned squid Illex argentinus (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) inferred from the diets of Southern Ocean albatrosses using stable isotope analyses


The diets of marine predators are a potential source of information about range shifts in their prey. For example, the short-finned squid Illex argentinus, a commercially fished species on the Patagonian Shelf in the South Atlantic, has been reported in the diet of grey-headed, Thalassarche chrysostoma; black-browed, T. melanophris; and wandering, Diomedea exulans, albatrosses breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 28°W) in the Southern Ocean. Tracking data suggest that these birds may feed on I. argentinus while foraging in Southern Ocean waters during their breeding season. This led to the hypothesis that I. argentinus may occur south of the Antarctic Polar Front. To test this hypothesis, we used stable isotope analyses to assess the origin of I. argentinus. We compared I. argentinus beaks from the diets of the three albatross species with beaks of cephalopod species endemic to the Patagonian Shelf and others from the Southern Ocean. Our results show that I. argentinus from the diet of albatrosses at Bird Island have ?13C values in the range ?18.77 to ?15.28‰. This is consistent with ?13C values for Octopus tehuelchus, a typical species from the Patagonian Shelf. In contrast, Alluroteuthis antarcticus, a Southern Ocean squid, has typically Antarctic ?13C in the range ?25.46 to ?18.61‰. This suggests that I. argentinus originated from warmer waters of the Patagonian Shelf region. It is more likely that the albatross species obtained I. argentinus by foraging in the Patagonian Shelf region than that I. argentinus naturally occurs south of the Antarctic Polar Front.
0025-3154
1211-1215
Seco, José
732876da-a8c4-4149-bedf-f1ed554a3efc
Daneri, Gustavo A.
76011ff8-4017-4d8b-81fe-091b0abe4ccd
Ceia, Filipe R.
4aabaf88-0e79-4928-8b8b-aec595302636
Vieira, Rui Pedro
ef3c005f-e747-47ef-812f-973a9fc0d0d7
Hill, Simeon L.
fa9232ef-672c-4c5d-aca2-98168d352a19
Xavier, José Carlos
bc4b4e75-2d2d-4ee2-8d3b-bf9cf7465f52
Seco, José
732876da-a8c4-4149-bedf-f1ed554a3efc
Daneri, Gustavo A.
76011ff8-4017-4d8b-81fe-091b0abe4ccd
Ceia, Filipe R.
4aabaf88-0e79-4928-8b8b-aec595302636
Vieira, Rui Pedro
ef3c005f-e747-47ef-812f-973a9fc0d0d7
Hill, Simeon L.
fa9232ef-672c-4c5d-aca2-98168d352a19
Xavier, José Carlos
bc4b4e75-2d2d-4ee2-8d3b-bf9cf7465f52

Seco, José, Daneri, Gustavo A., Ceia, Filipe R., Vieira, Rui Pedro, Hill, Simeon L. and Xavier, José Carlos (2016) Distribution of short-finned squid Illex argentinus (Cephalopoda: Ommastrephidae) inferred from the diets of Southern Ocean albatrosses using stable isotope analyses. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 96 (6), 1211-1215. (doi:10.1017/S0025315415000752).

Record type: Article

Abstract



The diets of marine predators are a potential source of information about range shifts in their prey. For example, the short-finned squid Illex argentinus, a commercially fished species on the Patagonian Shelf in the South Atlantic, has been reported in the diet of grey-headed, Thalassarche chrysostoma; black-browed, T. melanophris; and wandering, Diomedea exulans, albatrosses breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 28°W) in the Southern Ocean. Tracking data suggest that these birds may feed on I. argentinus while foraging in Southern Ocean waters during their breeding season. This led to the hypothesis that I. argentinus may occur south of the Antarctic Polar Front. To test this hypothesis, we used stable isotope analyses to assess the origin of I. argentinus. We compared I. argentinus beaks from the diets of the three albatross species with beaks of cephalopod species endemic to the Patagonian Shelf and others from the Southern Ocean. Our results show that I. argentinus from the diet of albatrosses at Bird Island have ?13C values in the range ?18.77 to ?15.28‰. This is consistent with ?13C values for Octopus tehuelchus, a typical species from the Patagonian Shelf. In contrast, Alluroteuthis antarcticus, a Southern Ocean squid, has typically Antarctic ?13C in the range ?25.46 to ?18.61‰. This suggests that I. argentinus originated from warmer waters of the Patagonian Shelf region. It is more likely that the albatross species obtained I. argentinus by foraging in the Patagonian Shelf region than that I. argentinus naturally occurs south of the Antarctic Polar Front.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 May 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 June 2015
Published date: September 2016
Organisations: Geochemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401553
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401553
ISSN: 0025-3154
PURE UUID: dcb245f6-0173-4a71-ad17-f925519bc2f4
ORCID for Rui Pedro Vieira: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8491-2565

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Oct 2016 13:14
Last modified: 07 Aug 2019 05:12

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