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Salinity affects the composition of the aerobic methanotroph community in alkaline lake sediments from the Tibetan Plateau

Salinity affects the composition of the aerobic methanotroph community in alkaline lake sediments from the Tibetan Plateau
Salinity affects the composition of the aerobic methanotroph community in alkaline lake sediments from the Tibetan Plateau
Lakes are widely distributed on the Tibetan Plateau, which plays an important role in natural methane emission. Aerobic methanotrophs in lake sediments reduce the amount of methane released into the atmosphere. However, no study to date has analyzed the methanotroph community composition and their driving factors in sediments of these high-altitude lakes (>4000 m). To provide new insights on this aspect, the abundance and composition in the sediments of six high-altitude alkaline lakes (including both freshwater and saline lakes) on the Tibetan Plateau were studied. The quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454- pyrosequencing methods were used to target the pmoA genes. The pmoA gene copies ranged 10? -10? per gram fresh sediment. Type I methanotrophs predominated in Tibetan lake sediments, with Methylobacter and uncultivated type Ib methanotrophs being dominant in freshwater lakes and Methylomicrobium in saline lakes. Combining the pmoA-pyrosequencing data from Tibetan lakes with other published pmoAsequencing data from lake sediments of other regions, a significant salinity and alkalinity effect (P=0.001) was detected, especially salinity, explained ~25% of methanotroph community variability. The main effect was Methylomicrobium being dominant (up to 100%) in saline lakes only. In freshwater lakes, however, methanotroph composition was relatively diverse, including Methylobacter, Methylocystis, and uncultured type Ib clusters. This study provides the first methanotroph data for high-altitude lake sediments (>4000 m) and shows that salinity is a driving factor for the community composition of aerobic methanotrophs.
0095-3628
1-10
Deng, Yongcui
5823c5fe-5a0d-4002-972c-48882272a423
Liu, Yongqin
d7ce1142-d3a8-4f50-b661-8544378d3c8b
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Conrad, Ralf
b63adcc7-abe3-4e99-9ce6-20f1cc671d96
Deng, Yongcui
5823c5fe-5a0d-4002-972c-48882272a423
Liu, Yongqin
d7ce1142-d3a8-4f50-b661-8544378d3c8b
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Conrad, Ralf
b63adcc7-abe3-4e99-9ce6-20f1cc671d96

Deng, Yongcui, Liu, Yongqin, Dumont, Marc and Conrad, Ralf (2016) Salinity affects the composition of the aerobic methanotroph community in alkaline lake sediments from the Tibetan Plateau. Microbial Ecology, 1-10. (doi:10.1007/s00248-016-0879-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Lakes are widely distributed on the Tibetan Plateau, which plays an important role in natural methane emission. Aerobic methanotrophs in lake sediments reduce the amount of methane released into the atmosphere. However, no study to date has analyzed the methanotroph community composition and their driving factors in sediments of these high-altitude lakes (>4000 m). To provide new insights on this aspect, the abundance and composition in the sediments of six high-altitude alkaline lakes (including both freshwater and saline lakes) on the Tibetan Plateau were studied. The quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 454- pyrosequencing methods were used to target the pmoA genes. The pmoA gene copies ranged 10? -10? per gram fresh sediment. Type I methanotrophs predominated in Tibetan lake sediments, with Methylobacter and uncultivated type Ib methanotrophs being dominant in freshwater lakes and Methylomicrobium in saline lakes. Combining the pmoA-pyrosequencing data from Tibetan lakes with other published pmoAsequencing data from lake sediments of other regions, a significant salinity and alkalinity effect (P=0.001) was detected, especially salinity, explained ~25% of methanotroph community variability. The main effect was Methylomicrobium being dominant (up to 100%) in saline lakes only. In freshwater lakes, however, methanotroph composition was relatively diverse, including Methylobacter, Methylocystis, and uncultured type Ib clusters. This study provides the first methanotroph data for high-altitude lake sediments (>4000 m) and shows that salinity is a driving factor for the community composition of aerobic methanotrophs.

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MECO-D-16-00423_R2[1].pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 12 October 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 November 2016
Organisations: Environmental

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 401720
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/401720
ISSN: 0095-3628
PURE UUID: 9fb3d9fe-2f9d-495b-ab81-dbd7cb0e27dd
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

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Date deposited: 20 Oct 2016 12:36
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 07:12

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Contributors

Author: Yongcui Deng
Author: Yongqin Liu
Author: Marc Dumont ORCID iD
Author: Ralf Conrad

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