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Seasonal population movements and the surveillance and control of infectious diseases

Seasonal population movements and the surveillance and control of infectious diseases
Seasonal population movements and the surveillance and control of infectious diseases
National policies designed to control infectious diseases should allocate resources for interventions based on regional estimates of disease burden from surveillance systems. For many infectious diseases, however, there is pronounced seasonal variation in incidence. Policy-makers must routinely manage a public health response to these seasonal fluctuations with limited understanding of their underlying causes. Two complementary and poorly described drivers of seasonal disease incidence are the mobility and aggregation of human populations, which spark outbreaks and sustain transmission, respectively, and may both exhibit distinct seasonal variations. Here we highlight the key challenges that seasonal migration creates when monitoring and controlling infectious diseases. We discuss the potential of new data sources in accounting for seasonal population movements in dynamic risk mapping strategies.
1471-4922
1-11
Buckee, Caroline O.
f4bc891c-4f42-46a6-822d-03fc1f9cd55b
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Metcalf, C. Jessica E.
ce1431b5-f784-4552-b66c-52fcb08f095c
Buckee, Caroline O.
f4bc891c-4f42-46a6-822d-03fc1f9cd55b
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Metcalf, C. Jessica E.
ce1431b5-f784-4552-b66c-52fcb08f095c

Buckee, Caroline O., Tatem, Andrew J. and Metcalf, C. Jessica E. (2016) Seasonal population movements and the surveillance and control of infectious diseases. Trends in Parasitology, 1-11. (doi:10.1016/j.pt.2016.10.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

National policies designed to control infectious diseases should allocate resources for interventions based on regional estimates of disease burden from surveillance systems. For many infectious diseases, however, there is pronounced seasonal variation in incidence. Policy-makers must routinely manage a public health response to these seasonal fluctuations with limited understanding of their underlying causes. Two complementary and poorly described drivers of seasonal disease incidence are the mobility and aggregation of human populations, which spark outbreaks and sustain transmission, respectively, and may both exhibit distinct seasonal variations. Here we highlight the key challenges that seasonal migration creates when monitoring and controlling infectious diseases. We discuss the potential of new data sources in accounting for seasonal population movements in dynamic risk mapping strategies.

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 November 2016
Organisations: Global Env Change & Earth Observation, WorldPop, Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 403124
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/403124
ISSN: 1471-4922
PURE UUID: 9a1a54b6-03d4-4a78-a0f0-31b8d3fc29c8
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Nov 2016 12:20
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:37

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