The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Microbiota of dominant Atlantic copepods: Pleuromamma sp. as a host to a betaproteobacterial symbiont

Microbiota of dominant Atlantic copepods: Pleuromamma sp. as a host to a betaproteobacterial symbiont
Microbiota of dominant Atlantic copepods: Pleuromamma sp. as a host to a betaproteobacterial symbiont
Copepods are the most abundant zooplankton group in the ocean and play a pivotal role as grazers of microorganisms and prey for larger animals. Furthermore, they are major contributors to the pool of dissolved organic material in the pelagic and therefore play an important role in the microbial loop. Although biology of copepods has been under investigation for more than a century, few studies have looked at the relationship between copepods and their associated bacteria. Could copepods be perceived as distinctive microbial hotspots in nutrient poor pelagic environment?

The microbiota of three Pleuromamma species, an abundant genus of copepods that migrate vertically from surface waters to several hundred meters water depth and back on a daily basis was investigated using various molecular and morphological techniques. The focus was on the differences in the bacterial community composition of these copepods along the Atlantic Meridional Transect, which traverses major oceanic biomes such as the subtropical gyres and the equatorial convergence region. Additionally, the community structure and stable isotope composition of the likely microplankton food source as well as the Pleuromamma copepods was assessed along the same cruise transect.

Sequencing of 16S rRNA tag libraries derived from individual Pleruromamma copepods showed a broad diversity of Bacteria associated with these copepods. These bacterial communities were uniform across the oceanic provinces and Pleuromamma species. These results were reflected in the uniformity of the prey community composition, however there was an indication that Pleuromamma copepods from different regions in the Atlantic rely on different food sources. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and electron microscopy showed the presence of bacteria in the midgut region of the copepod guts and more specifically a high abundance of Betaproteobacteria.

The bacterial community of a dominant copepod species in the Atlantic has previously not been studied on such a large spatial scale and sample size. This study shows that the same bacterial taxa were associated with Pleuromamma copepods inhabiting distinct oceanic regions. Moreover, a betaproteobacterial genus not present in the water-column appears to be closely associated with Pleuromamma.
Cregeen, Sara Joan Javornik
3f61d96e-0e60-4a16-84d3-059489c9f192
Cregeen, Sara Joan Javornik
3f61d96e-0e60-4a16-84d3-059489c9f192
Connelly, Douglas
d49131bb-af38-4768-9953-7ae0b43e33c8

(2016) Microbiota of dominant Atlantic copepods: Pleuromamma sp. as a host to a betaproteobacterial symbiont. University of Southampton, Ocean & Earth Science, Doctoral Thesis, 161pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Copepods are the most abundant zooplankton group in the ocean and play a pivotal role as grazers of microorganisms and prey for larger animals. Furthermore, they are major contributors to the pool of dissolved organic material in the pelagic and therefore play an important role in the microbial loop. Although biology of copepods has been under investigation for more than a century, few studies have looked at the relationship between copepods and their associated bacteria. Could copepods be perceived as distinctive microbial hotspots in nutrient poor pelagic environment?

The microbiota of three Pleuromamma species, an abundant genus of copepods that migrate vertically from surface waters to several hundred meters water depth and back on a daily basis was investigated using various molecular and morphological techniques. The focus was on the differences in the bacterial community composition of these copepods along the Atlantic Meridional Transect, which traverses major oceanic biomes such as the subtropical gyres and the equatorial convergence region. Additionally, the community structure and stable isotope composition of the likely microplankton food source as well as the Pleuromamma copepods was assessed along the same cruise transect.

Sequencing of 16S rRNA tag libraries derived from individual Pleruromamma copepods showed a broad diversity of Bacteria associated with these copepods. These bacterial communities were uniform across the oceanic provinces and Pleuromamma species. These results were reflected in the uniformity of the prey community composition, however there was an indication that Pleuromamma copepods from different regions in the Atlantic rely on different food sources. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation and electron microscopy showed the presence of bacteria in the midgut region of the copepod guts and more specifically a high abundance of Betaproteobacteria.

The bacterial community of a dominant copepod species in the Atlantic has previously not been studied on such a large spatial scale and sample size. This study shows that the same bacterial taxa were associated with Pleuromamma copepods inhabiting distinct oceanic regions. Moreover, a betaproteobacterial genus not present in the water-column appears to be closely associated with Pleuromamma.

PDF
Cregeen_Sara_PhD-Thesis.pdf - Other
Download (8MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 November 2016
Organisations: University of Southampton, Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 403351
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/403351
PURE UUID: b44b9263-464c-483b-bca0-a31df2837d0f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Dec 2016 14:03
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 04:09

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×