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Multi-generational cohorts in asthma and allergy

Multi-generational cohorts in asthma and allergy
Multi-generational cohorts in asthma and allergy
Recent observations that disease risk can be transmitted across generations, without the need for a direct exposure of the child to the index environmental insult, has sparked interest in transgenerational inheritance. Epigenetic describes processes that modify gene expression without a change in the nucleotide sequence. Epigenetic processes can be induced in response to environmental exposures and can influence disease risk, and may explain these multigenerational effects. In experimental models, a number of epigenetic mechanisms have been identified that could mediate vertical transmission of epigenetic inheritance. However, relevance of these findings to human disease is not yet clear. An alternative model is where transgenerational inheritance of disease risk requires the presence of exposure-related diseases in the mother during pregnancy (termed ‘induced epigenetic transmission model’).

A number of cross-sectional studies have investigated multigenerational effects in allergy and asthma. However, given early life origins of asthma and allergy, birth cohort studies are ideal to investigate the impact of genetic predisposition, epigenetics, and environmental exposures avoiding pitfalls such as recall bias and confounding by ongoing exposures, disease and treatment. The well characterized, three generations of the Isle of Wight cohort includes two consecutive birth cohorts, providing longitudinal data that can be studied for epigenetic transfer of information, e.g., the effect of grand parental smoking or exposure to other toxic compounds. Further large multigenerational birth cohorts are needed to establish the clinical relevance of this phenomenon and differentiate between vertical and induced transmission models, which may influence future preventive strategies.
0091-6749
415-421
Arshad, Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Karmaus, Wilfried
281d0e53-6b5d-4d38-9732-3981b07cd853
Zhang, Hongmei
9f774048-54d6-4321-a252-3887b2c76db0
Holloway, John W.
4bbd77e6-c095-445d-a36b-a50a72f6fe1a
Arshad, Hasan
917e246d-2e60-472f-8d30-94b01ef28958
Karmaus, Wilfried
281d0e53-6b5d-4d38-9732-3981b07cd853
Zhang, Hongmei
9f774048-54d6-4321-a252-3887b2c76db0
Holloway, John W.
4bbd77e6-c095-445d-a36b-a50a72f6fe1a

Arshad, Hasan, Karmaus, Wilfried, Zhang, Hongmei and Holloway, John W. (2017) Multi-generational cohorts in asthma and allergy Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 139, (2), pp. 415-421.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent observations that disease risk can be transmitted across generations, without the need for a direct exposure of the child to the index environmental insult, has sparked interest in transgenerational inheritance. Epigenetic describes processes that modify gene expression without a change in the nucleotide sequence. Epigenetic processes can be induced in response to environmental exposures and can influence disease risk, and may explain these multigenerational effects. In experimental models, a number of epigenetic mechanisms have been identified that could mediate vertical transmission of epigenetic inheritance. However, relevance of these findings to human disease is not yet clear. An alternative model is where transgenerational inheritance of disease risk requires the presence of exposure-related diseases in the mother during pregnancy (termed ‘induced epigenetic transmission model’).

A number of cross-sectional studies have investigated multigenerational effects in allergy and asthma. However, given early life origins of asthma and allergy, birth cohort studies are ideal to investigate the impact of genetic predisposition, epigenetics, and environmental exposures avoiding pitfalls such as recall bias and confounding by ongoing exposures, disease and treatment. The well characterized, three generations of the Isle of Wight cohort includes two consecutive birth cohorts, providing longitudinal data that can be studied for epigenetic transfer of information, e.g., the effect of grand parental smoking or exposure to other toxic compounds. Further large multigenerational birth cohorts are needed to establish the clinical relevance of this phenomenon and differentiate between vertical and induced transmission models, which may influence future preventive strategies.

Other Multi-generational cohort paper-revised-unmarked.docx - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 December 2017.
Image (JPEG) Figure 1 Arshad Rostrum Multi-generational cohort.jpg - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 December 2017.
Image (JPEG) Figs 2 - (v3) Arshad Rostrum-Multi-generational cohort.jpg - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 December 2017.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 December 2016
Published date: February 2017
Organisations: Human Development & Health, Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 403558
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/403558
ISSN: 0091-6749
PURE UUID: 0e30e9ba-6e0c-407e-a75b-9f390442b67d
ORCID for John W. Holloway: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9998-0464

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Dec 2016 14:46
Last modified: 29 Sep 2017 22:46

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Contributors

Author: Hasan Arshad
Author: Wilfried Karmaus
Author: Hongmei Zhang

University divisions

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