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The effect of timing and frequency of push notifications on usage of a smartphone-based stress management intervention: an exploratory trial

The effect of timing and frequency of push notifications on usage of a smartphone-based stress management intervention: an exploratory trial
The effect of timing and frequency of push notifications on usage of a smartphone-based stress management intervention: an exploratory trial
Push notifications offer a promising strategy for enhancing engagement with smartphone-based health interventions. Intelligent sensor-driven machine learning models may improve the timeliness of notifications by adapting delivery to a user’s current context (e.g. location). This exploratory mixed-methods study examined the potential impact of timing and frequency on notification response and usage of Healthy Mind, a smartphone-based stress management intervention. 77 participants were randomised to use one of three versions of Healthy Mind that provided: intelligent notifications; daily notifications within pre-defined time frames; or occasional notifications within pre-defined time frames. Notification response and Healthy Mind usage were automatically recorded. Telephone interviews explored participants’ experiences of using Healthy Mind. Participants in the intelligent and daily conditions viewed (d = .47, .44 respectively) and actioned (d = .50, .43 respectively) more notifications compared to the occasional group. Notification group had no meaningful effects on percentage of notifications viewed or usage of Healthy Mind. No meaningful differences were indicated between the intelligent and non-intelligent groups. Our findings suggest that frequent notifications may encourage greater exposure to intervention content without deterring engagement, but adaptive tailoring of notification timing does not always enhance their use. Hypotheses generated from this study require testing in future work.
1932-6203
1-32
Morrison, Leanne
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Hargood, Charlie
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Pejovic, Veljko
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Geraghty, Adam
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Lloyd, Scott
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Goodman, Natalie
c7c72ff7-d4ce-42ad-a84b-e8ee6bf7be0b
Michaelides, Danius
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Weston, Anna
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Musolesi, Mirco
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Weal, Mark
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Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Morrison, Leanne
920a4eda-0f9d-4bd9-842d-6873b1afafef
Hargood, Charlie
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Pejovic, Veljko
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Geraghty, Adam
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Lloyd, Scott
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Goodman, Natalie
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Michaelides, Danius
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Weston, Anna
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Musolesi, Mirco
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Weal, Mark
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Yardley, Lucy
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Morrison, Leanne, Hargood, Charlie, Pejovic, Veljko, Geraghty, Adam, Lloyd, Scott, Goodman, Natalie, Michaelides, Danius, Weston, Anna, Musolesi, Mirco, Weal, Mark and Yardley, Lucy (2017) The effect of timing and frequency of push notifications on usage of a smartphone-based stress management intervention: an exploratory trial. PLoS ONE, 12 (1), 1-32. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0169162).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Push notifications offer a promising strategy for enhancing engagement with smartphone-based health interventions. Intelligent sensor-driven machine learning models may improve the timeliness of notifications by adapting delivery to a user’s current context (e.g. location). This exploratory mixed-methods study examined the potential impact of timing and frequency on notification response and usage of Healthy Mind, a smartphone-based stress management intervention. 77 participants were randomised to use one of three versions of Healthy Mind that provided: intelligent notifications; daily notifications within pre-defined time frames; or occasional notifications within pre-defined time frames. Notification response and Healthy Mind usage were automatically recorded. Telephone interviews explored participants’ experiences of using Healthy Mind. Participants in the intelligent and daily conditions viewed (d = .47, .44 respectively) and actioned (d = .50, .43 respectively) more notifications compared to the occasional group. Notification group had no meaningful effects on percentage of notifications viewed or usage of Healthy Mind. No meaningful differences were indicated between the intelligent and non-intelligent groups. Our findings suggest that frequent notifications may encourage greater exposure to intervention content without deterring engagement, but adaptive tailoring of notification timing does not always enhance their use. Hypotheses generated from this study require testing in future work.

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 January 2017
Published date: 3 January 2017
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, Primary Care & Population Sciences, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 404088
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/404088
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 26dc7f3a-3906-4e1a-bc9f-d76f44da0594
ORCID for Leanne Morrison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9961-551X
ORCID for Anna Weston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1675-0466
ORCID for Mark Weal: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6251-8786
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Dec 2016 11:52
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 05:32

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Contributors

Author: Leanne Morrison ORCID iD
Author: Charlie Hargood
Author: Veljko Pejovic
Author: Adam Geraghty
Author: Scott Lloyd
Author: Natalie Goodman
Author: Danius Michaelides
Author: Anna Weston ORCID iD
Author: Mirco Musolesi
Author: Mark Weal ORCID iD
Author: Lucy Yardley ORCID iD

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