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Beetroot juice versus chard gel: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of nitrate bioavailability.

Beetroot juice versus chard gel: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of nitrate bioavailability.
Beetroot juice versus chard gel: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of nitrate bioavailability.
Dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate (NO3?) has been shown to induce a multitude of advantageous cardiovascular and metabolic responses during rest and exercise. While there is some suggestion that pharmacokinetics may differ depending on the NO3? source ingested, to the best of our knowledge this has yet to be determined experimentally. Here, we compare the plasma pharmacokinetics of NO3?, nitrite (NO2?), and total nitroso species (RXNO) following oral ingestion of either NO3? rich beetroot juice (BR) or chard gels (GEL) with the associated changes in blood pressure (BP). Repeated samples of venous blood and measurements of BP were collected from nine healthy human volunteers before and after ingestion of the supplements using a cross-over design. Plasma concentrations of RXNO and NO2? were quantified using reductive gas-phase chemiluminescence and NO3? using high pressure liquid ion chromatography. We report that, [NO3?] and [NO2?] were increased and systolic BP reduced to a similar extent in each experimental arm, with considerable inter-individual variation. Intriguingly, there was a greater increase in [RXNO] following ingestion of BR in comparison to GEL, which may be a consequence of its higher polyphenol content. In conclusion, our data suggests that while differences in circulating NO2? and NO3? concentrations after oral administration of distinct NO3?-rich supplementation sources are moderate, concentrations of metabolic by-products may show greater-than-expected variability; the significance of the latter observation for the biological effects under study remains to be investigated.
1089-8603
1-7
McIlvenna, Luke
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Monaghan, Chris
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Liddle, Luke
fc412297-ec88-4d99-a3c2-9570b5e682e9
Fernandez, Bernadette
9890aabc-1fe6-4530-a51e-31182e537131
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Muggeridge, David
39881410-5a22-458f-afd6-4746f7d81517
Easton, Chris
76f6cbdd-284c-477f-8d6a-5d11aaced94c
McIlvenna, Luke
f7be0871-6de5-4fc3-b8bf-91adb3a83b46
Monaghan, Chris
58f45991-cd8e-49a6-af16-158cc0e27a8d
Liddle, Luke
fc412297-ec88-4d99-a3c2-9570b5e682e9
Fernandez, Bernadette
9890aabc-1fe6-4530-a51e-31182e537131
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Muggeridge, David
39881410-5a22-458f-afd6-4746f7d81517
Easton, Chris
76f6cbdd-284c-477f-8d6a-5d11aaced94c

McIlvenna, Luke, Monaghan, Chris, Liddle, Luke, Fernandez, Bernadette, Feelisch, Martin, Muggeridge, David and Easton, Chris (2016) Beetroot juice versus chard gel: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic comparison of nitrate bioavailability. Nitric Oxide, 1-7. (doi:10.1016/j.niox.2016.12.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate (NO3?) has been shown to induce a multitude of advantageous cardiovascular and metabolic responses during rest and exercise. While there is some suggestion that pharmacokinetics may differ depending on the NO3? source ingested, to the best of our knowledge this has yet to be determined experimentally. Here, we compare the plasma pharmacokinetics of NO3?, nitrite (NO2?), and total nitroso species (RXNO) following oral ingestion of either NO3? rich beetroot juice (BR) or chard gels (GEL) with the associated changes in blood pressure (BP). Repeated samples of venous blood and measurements of BP were collected from nine healthy human volunteers before and after ingestion of the supplements using a cross-over design. Plasma concentrations of RXNO and NO2? were quantified using reductive gas-phase chemiluminescence and NO3? using high pressure liquid ion chromatography. We report that, [NO3?] and [NO2?] were increased and systolic BP reduced to a similar extent in each experimental arm, with considerable inter-individual variation. Intriguingly, there was a greater increase in [RXNO] following ingestion of BR in comparison to GEL, which may be a consequence of its higher polyphenol content. In conclusion, our data suggests that while differences in circulating NO2? and NO3? concentrations after oral administration of distinct NO3?-rich supplementation sources are moderate, concentrations of metabolic by-products may show greater-than-expected variability; the significance of the latter observation for the biological effects under study remains to be investigated.

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2016-McIlvenna et al-NO-in press.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 14 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 December 2016
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 405151
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405151
ISSN: 1089-8603
PURE UUID: 1b23f020-a2d7-46bd-bedb-44959ffd200a
ORCID for Bernadette Fernandez: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6337-0381
ORCID for Martin Feelisch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-1158

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Date deposited: 27 Jan 2017 14:17
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 06:14

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Contributors

Author: Luke McIlvenna
Author: Chris Monaghan
Author: Luke Liddle
Author: Bernadette Fernandez ORCID iD
Author: Martin Feelisch ORCID iD
Author: David Muggeridge
Author: Chris Easton

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