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Contraceptive use among women in Accra, Ghana: 2003 and 2008

Contraceptive use among women in Accra, Ghana: 2003 and 2008
Contraceptive use among women in Accra, Ghana: 2003 and 2008
Despite a relatively low fertility rate, maternal mortality in Ghana still remains high. According to the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys, about 22% of Ghanaian women of reproductive age currently use contraception. We analyzed contraceptive use among a representative sample of women in Accra, Ghana, to better understand contraceptive use patterns. We used data from two cross-sectional surveys of a representative cohort of women in Accra. In 2003, 28.9% of sexually active women used a contraceptive method. In 2008, 31.5% of sexually active women used a contraceptive method. Additionally, we observed high rates of discontinuation—from 64.1% among those using longer-acting methods to 82.1% among those using traditional methods—between years. Further research on women’s contraceptive decision-making is needed to explain these patterns and to ensure that family planning interventions meet the needs of women in Ghana. (Afr. J Reprod Health 2016; 20[4]: 22-36).
1118-4841
22-36
Blanchard, Kelly
13736227-f2e6-4ed8-b33b-16578b944123
Gutierrez, Hialy
3773426e-1031-4fa6-80ac-bd23ebd641c3
Lince-Deroche, Naomi
273eb2c1-6b64-435d-9dc9-d41cdf0ffdb7
Adanu, Richard
f30addfb-ccd8-42c9-a638-18b32ed2dc62
Hill, Allan
5b17aa71-0c14-4fbf-8bc9-807c8294d4ae
Blanchard, Kelly
13736227-f2e6-4ed8-b33b-16578b944123
Gutierrez, Hialy
3773426e-1031-4fa6-80ac-bd23ebd641c3
Lince-Deroche, Naomi
273eb2c1-6b64-435d-9dc9-d41cdf0ffdb7
Adanu, Richard
f30addfb-ccd8-42c9-a638-18b32ed2dc62
Hill, Allan
5b17aa71-0c14-4fbf-8bc9-807c8294d4ae

Blanchard, Kelly, Gutierrez, Hialy, Lince-Deroche, Naomi, Adanu, Richard and Hill, Allan (2016) Contraceptive use among women in Accra, Ghana: 2003 and 2008. African Journal of Reproductive Health, 20 (4), 22-36.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Despite a relatively low fertility rate, maternal mortality in Ghana still remains high. According to the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys, about 22% of Ghanaian women of reproductive age currently use contraception. We analyzed contraceptive use among a representative sample of women in Accra, Ghana, to better understand contraceptive use patterns. We used data from two cross-sectional surveys of a representative cohort of women in Accra. In 2003, 28.9% of sexually active women used a contraceptive method. In 2008, 31.5% of sexually active women used a contraceptive method. Additionally, we observed high rates of discontinuation—from 64.1% among those using longer-acting methods to 82.1% among those using traditional methods—between years. Further research on women’s contraceptive decision-making is needed to explain these patterns and to ensure that family planning interventions meet the needs of women in Ghana. (Afr. J Reprod Health 2016; 20[4]: 22-36).

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Contraceptive use in Accra in 2003 and 2008 (2016 12 12) - Accepted Manuscript
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Contraceptive use in Accra in 2003 and 2008 (2016 12 12) - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 November 2016
Published date: December 2016
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 405672
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/405672
ISSN: 1118-4841
PURE UUID: cbc41f4b-007c-47bb-876c-0e6b6f6d9146
ORCID for Allan Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4418-0379

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Date deposited: 10 Feb 2017 14:41
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:45

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