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Influence of fatty acid methyl ester composition on tribological properties of vegetable oils and duck fat derived biodiesel

Influence of fatty acid methyl ester composition on tribological properties of vegetable oils and duck fat derived biodiesel
Influence of fatty acid methyl ester composition on tribological properties of vegetable oils and duck fat derived biodiesel
To explore its potential as a biolubricant/additive, the study determines the frictional properties at various lubrication regimes for biodiesels derived from vegetable oils, hydrogenated vegetable oil and animal fat. It is found that the frictional characteristics for the biodiesels can be divided into Group I (feedstocks from winter crops) and Group II (feedstocks from summer crops, animal fat and hydrogenated vegetable oil). For each of the groups, with decreasing ratio of mono-unsaturated to total saturated fatty acid methyl ester content, the biodiesels’ friction force reduces while their load carrying capacity deteriorates. From the experimental results, it is deduced that soybean biodiesel shows great potential as a biolubricant/additive because it possesses low friction force with the highest possible load carrying capacity.
Green Tribology , Biodiesel, Frictional mapping, Biolubricant
0301-679X
Hamdan, S.H.
9f001b31-cf6c-4a8b-b048-2db0f52d50fb
Chong, W.W.F.
bd35fdf8-fa6d-4330-8bac-ae20cc8fc58e
Ng, Jo-Han
579e1556-0b23-4c17-9bc8-37f9a2f6bfc8
Ghazali, M.J.
1b31d876-4e35-41b1-8a5d-4cb90e1001bc
Wood, R.J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Hamdan, S.H.
9f001b31-cf6c-4a8b-b048-2db0f52d50fb
Chong, W.W.F.
bd35fdf8-fa6d-4330-8bac-ae20cc8fc58e
Ng, Jo-Han
579e1556-0b23-4c17-9bc8-37f9a2f6bfc8
Ghazali, M.J.
1b31d876-4e35-41b1-8a5d-4cb90e1001bc
Wood, R.J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73

Hamdan, S.H., Chong, W.W.F., Ng, Jo-Han, Ghazali, M.J. and Wood, R.J.K. (2016) Influence of fatty acid methyl ester composition on tribological properties of vegetable oils and duck fat derived biodiesel. Tribology International. (doi:10.1016/j.triboint.2016.12.008).

Record type: Article

Abstract

To explore its potential as a biolubricant/additive, the study determines the frictional properties at various lubrication regimes for biodiesels derived from vegetable oils, hydrogenated vegetable oil and animal fat. It is found that the frictional characteristics for the biodiesels can be divided into Group I (feedstocks from winter crops) and Group II (feedstocks from summer crops, animal fat and hydrogenated vegetable oil). For each of the groups, with decreasing ratio of mono-unsaturated to total saturated fatty acid methyl ester content, the biodiesels’ friction force reduces while their load carrying capacity deteriorates. From the experimental results, it is deduced that soybean biodiesel shows great potential as a biolubricant/additive because it possesses low friction force with the highest possible load carrying capacity.

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hamdan_et_al_revised_FINAL - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 7 December 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 December 2016
Keywords: Green Tribology , Biodiesel, Frictional mapping, Biolubricant
Organisations: nCATS Group, Education Hub

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406388
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406388
ISSN: 0301-679X
PURE UUID: 1fc8fd5b-6856-45ff-8940-b97af63761d5
ORCID for R.J.K. Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2017 10:46
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:43

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Contributors

Author: S.H. Hamdan
Author: W.W.F. Chong
Author: Jo-Han Ng
Author: M.J. Ghazali
Author: R.J.K. Wood ORCID iD

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