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Radically open DBT: targeting emotional loneliness in Anorexia Nervosa

Radically open DBT: targeting emotional loneliness in Anorexia Nervosa
Radically open DBT: targeting emotional loneliness in Anorexia Nervosa
This paper conceptualizes Anorexia Nervosa as a prototypical overcontrolled disorder, characterized by low receptivity and openness, low flexible control, pervasive inhibited emotional expressiveness, low emotional awareness, and low social connectedness and intimacy with others. As a result, individuals with Anorexia Nervosa often report high levels of emotional loneliness. A new evidence-based treatment, Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO-DBT), and its underlying neuroregulatory theory, offer a novel way of understanding how self-starvation and social signaling deficits are used as maladaptive regulation strategies to reduce negative affect. RO-DBT proposes that rather than trying to be ‘emotionally regulated’ or achieving equanimity, long-term psychological well-being is achieved by increasing social connectedness. RO-DBT skills, including body posture, gestures, and facial expressions, activate brain regions that increase social safety responses that function to automatically enhance open-minded and flexible social-signaling, which are crucial for establishing long-term intimate bonds with others and becoming part of a “tribe.”
1532-530X
92-104
Hempel, Roelie
2dfa9856-74dd-49b5-86e6-f78eace6727f
Vanderbleek, Emily
d688008d-d543-489b-bd03-30cc10dc93e3
Lynch, Thomas
29e90123-0aef-46c8-b320-1617fb48bb20
Hempel, Roelie
2dfa9856-74dd-49b5-86e6-f78eace6727f
Vanderbleek, Emily
d688008d-d543-489b-bd03-30cc10dc93e3
Lynch, Thomas
29e90123-0aef-46c8-b320-1617fb48bb20

Hempel, Roelie, Vanderbleek, Emily and Lynch, Thomas (2018) Radically open DBT: targeting emotional loneliness in Anorexia Nervosa. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention, 26 (1), 92-104. (doi:10.1080/10640266.2018.1418268).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper conceptualizes Anorexia Nervosa as a prototypical overcontrolled disorder, characterized by low receptivity and openness, low flexible control, pervasive inhibited emotional expressiveness, low emotional awareness, and low social connectedness and intimacy with others. As a result, individuals with Anorexia Nervosa often report high levels of emotional loneliness. A new evidence-based treatment, Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO-DBT), and its underlying neuroregulatory theory, offer a novel way of understanding how self-starvation and social signaling deficits are used as maladaptive regulation strategies to reduce negative affect. RO-DBT proposes that rather than trying to be ‘emotionally regulated’ or achieving equanimity, long-term psychological well-being is achieved by increasing social connectedness. RO-DBT skills, including body posture, gestures, and facial expressions, activate brain regions that increase social safety responses that function to automatically enhance open-minded and flexible social-signaling, which are crucial for establishing long-term intimate bonds with others and becoming part of a “tribe.”

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Hempel Vanderbleek Lynch_AN paper_after second review_v3 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 16 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2018
Published date: 2018
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406750
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406750
ISSN: 1532-530X
PURE UUID: af38fb16-0611-40c0-8c52-3a9588ccc867
ORCID for Thomas Lynch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1270-6097

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Date deposited: 22 Mar 2017 02:06
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:41

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