The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Translating developmental origins: Improving the health of women and their children using a substantial approach to behaviour change

Translating developmental origins: Improving the health of women and their children using a substantial approach to behaviour change
Translating developmental origins: Improving the health of women and their children using a substantial approach to behaviour change
Theories of the developmental origins of health and disease imply that optimising the growth and development of babies is an essential route to improving the health of populations. A key factor in the growth of babies is the nutritional status of their mothers. Since women from more disadvantaged backgrounds have poorer quality diets and the worst pregnancy outcomes, they need to be a particular focus. The behavioural sciences have made a substantial contribution to the development of interventions to support dietary changes in disadvantaged women. Translation of such interventions into routine practice is an ideal that is rarely achieved, however. This paper illustrates how re-orientating health and social care services towards an empowerment approach to behaviour change might underpin a new developmental focus to improving long-term health, using learning from a community-based intervention to improve the diets and lifestyles of disadvantaged women. The Southampton Initiative for Health aimed to improve the diets and lifestyles of women of child-bearing age through training health and social care practitioners in skills to support behaviour change. Analysis illustrates the necessary steps in mounting such an intervention: building trust; matching agendas and changing culture. The Southampton Initiative for Health demonstrates that developing sustainable; workable interventions and effective community partnerships; requires commitment beginning long before intervention delivery but is key to the translation of developmental origins research into improvements in human health.
2227-9032
Barker, Mary
374310ad-d308-44af-b6da-515bf5d2d6d2
Baird, Janis
f4bf2039-6118-436f-ab69-df8b4d17f824
Tinati, Tannaze
15d47d8c-b348-4bf8-ac14-9aa9e062d089
Vogel, Christina
768f1dcd-2697-4aae-95cc-ee2f6d63dff5
Strommer, Sofia
a025047e-effa-4481-9bf4-48da1668649e
Rose, Taylor
ad05dc29-02db-434e-8f06-e88bf09d5adb
Begum, Rufia
6b232476-e182-4f7d-a629-e9ca0771feb6
Jarman, Megan
a684fe3d-0567-4cb6-8985-667263e51457
Davies, Jenny
110c6e17-0220-4733-a02e-e78d7d7dece4
Thompson, Sue
87ac2b3a-0707-4796-88bf-4c4d8e83d9ae
Taylor, Liz
8175fe62-9aec-4f3b-a82b-93ce7663a88f
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Nutbeam, Don
dbd2271d-7e7c-40cf-9c8e-663d01580e47
Lawrence, Wendy
e9babc0a-02c9-41df-a289-7b18f17bf7d8
Barker, Mary
374310ad-d308-44af-b6da-515bf5d2d6d2
Baird, Janis
f4bf2039-6118-436f-ab69-df8b4d17f824
Tinati, Tannaze
15d47d8c-b348-4bf8-ac14-9aa9e062d089
Vogel, Christina
768f1dcd-2697-4aae-95cc-ee2f6d63dff5
Strommer, Sofia
a025047e-effa-4481-9bf4-48da1668649e
Rose, Taylor
ad05dc29-02db-434e-8f06-e88bf09d5adb
Begum, Rufia
6b232476-e182-4f7d-a629-e9ca0771feb6
Jarman, Megan
a684fe3d-0567-4cb6-8985-667263e51457
Davies, Jenny
110c6e17-0220-4733-a02e-e78d7d7dece4
Thompson, Sue
87ac2b3a-0707-4796-88bf-4c4d8e83d9ae
Taylor, Liz
8175fe62-9aec-4f3b-a82b-93ce7663a88f
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Nutbeam, Don
dbd2271d-7e7c-40cf-9c8e-663d01580e47
Lawrence, Wendy
e9babc0a-02c9-41df-a289-7b18f17bf7d8

Barker, Mary, Baird, Janis, Tinati, Tannaze, Vogel, Christina, Strommer, Sofia, Rose, Taylor, Begum, Rufia, Jarman, Megan, Davies, Jenny, Thompson, Sue, Taylor, Liz, Inskip, Hazel, Cooper, Cyrus, Nutbeam, Don and Lawrence, Wendy (2017) Translating developmental origins: Improving the health of women and their children using a substantial approach to behaviour change. Healthcare, 5 (1). (doi:10.3390/healthcare5010017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Theories of the developmental origins of health and disease imply that optimising the growth and development of babies is an essential route to improving the health of populations. A key factor in the growth of babies is the nutritional status of their mothers. Since women from more disadvantaged backgrounds have poorer quality diets and the worst pregnancy outcomes, they need to be a particular focus. The behavioural sciences have made a substantial contribution to the development of interventions to support dietary changes in disadvantaged women. Translation of such interventions into routine practice is an ideal that is rarely achieved, however. This paper illustrates how re-orientating health and social care services towards an empowerment approach to behaviour change might underpin a new developmental focus to improving long-term health, using learning from a community-based intervention to improve the diets and lifestyles of disadvantaged women. The Southampton Initiative for Health aimed to improve the diets and lifestyles of women of child-bearing age through training health and social care practitioners in skills to support behaviour change. Analysis illustrates the necessary steps in mounting such an intervention: building trust; matching agendas and changing culture. The Southampton Initiative for Health demonstrates that developing sustainable; workable interventions and effective community partnerships; requires commitment beginning long before intervention delivery but is key to the translation of developmental origins research into improvements in human health.

Text
Healthcare manuscript.v6 w MB amends - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (503kB)
Text
healthcare-05-00017 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (500kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 March 2017
Published date: 20 March 2017
Organisations: Epidemiology, Medical Research Council, Human Development & Health, NETSCC

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407359
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407359
ISSN: 2227-9032
PURE UUID: 24c2faee-b2ec-4328-b660-44ee655dbb51
ORCID for Mary Barker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2976-0217
ORCID for Janis Baird: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4039-4361
ORCID for Hazel Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Apr 2017 01:06
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Mary Barker ORCID iD
Author: Janis Baird ORCID iD
Author: Tannaze Tinati
Author: Christina Vogel
Author: Sofia Strommer
Author: Taylor Rose
Author: Rufia Begum
Author: Megan Jarman
Author: Jenny Davies
Author: Sue Thompson
Author: Liz Taylor
Author: Hazel Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Don Nutbeam
Author: Wendy Lawrence

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×