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Beyond human error taxonomies in assessment of risk in sociotechnical systems: a new paradigm with the EAST 'broken-links' approach

Beyond human error taxonomies in assessment of risk in sociotechnical systems: a new paradigm with the EAST 'broken-links' approach
Beyond human error taxonomies in assessment of risk in sociotechnical systems: a new paradigm with the EAST 'broken-links' approach
Risk assessments in Sociotechnical Systems (STS) tend to be based on error taxonomies, yet the term ‘human error’ does not sit easily with STS theories and concepts. A new break-link approach was proposed as an alternative risk assessment paradigm to reveal the effect of information communication failures between agents and tasks on the entire STS. A case study of the training of a Royal Navy crew detecting a low flying Hawk (simulating a sea-skimming missile) is presented using EAST to model the Hawk-Frigate STS in terms of social, information and task networks. By breaking 19 social links and 12 task links, 137 potential risks were identified. Discoveries included revealing the effect of risk moving around the system; reducing the risks to the Hawk increased the risks to the Frigate. Future research should examine the effects of compounded information communication failures on STS performance.
1366-5847
221-233
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Harvey, Catherine
f42f4188-ccb5-4a2e-bea9-4606c1c924e9
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Harvey, Catherine
f42f4188-ccb5-4a2e-bea9-4606c1c924e9

Stanton, Neville and Harvey, Catherine (2016) Beyond human error taxonomies in assessment of risk in sociotechnical systems: a new paradigm with the EAST 'broken-links' approach. Ergonomics, 60 (2), 221-233. (doi:10.1080/00140139.2016.1232841).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Risk assessments in Sociotechnical Systems (STS) tend to be based on error taxonomies, yet the term ‘human error’ does not sit easily with STS theories and concepts. A new break-link approach was proposed as an alternative risk assessment paradigm to reveal the effect of information communication failures between agents and tasks on the entire STS. A case study of the training of a Royal Navy crew detecting a low flying Hawk (simulating a sea-skimming missile) is presented using EAST to model the Hawk-Frigate STS in terms of social, information and task networks. By breaking 19 social links and 12 task links, 137 potential risks were identified. Discoveries included revealing the effect of risk moving around the system; reducing the risks to the Hawk increased the risks to the Frigate. Future research should examine the effects of compounded information communication failures on STS performance.

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Beyond human error taxonomies in assessment of risk in sociotechnical systems - Author's Original
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 August 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 September 2016
Published date: 4 November 2016
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407898
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407898
ISSN: 1366-5847
PURE UUID: 2e475c6e-5d0c-4272-841a-d0caee420eb8
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

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Date deposited: 28 Apr 2017 01:06
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 01:42

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