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Moving beyond input legitimacy: When do democratic innovations affect policymaking?

Moving beyond input legitimacy: When do democratic innovations affect policymaking?
Moving beyond input legitimacy: When do democratic innovations affect policymaking?
This article makes three key contributions to debates surrounding the effectiveness of democratic innovation, deliberation, and participation in representative political systems. In the first instance we argue that more attention should be paid to the role that participation actually plays in governance. We show that the literature on democratic institutional design often neglects concern about the effects of innovative institutional designs on more traditional representative fora, at the expense of concerns about their internal procedures. Secondly we argue that despite limitations, replicable systematic comparison of the effects of institutional design is both necessary and possible even at the level of national governance. We present a comparative analysis of 31 cases of National Public Policy Conferences (NPPCs) in Brazil. Finally, we show that popular deliberative assemblies that vary in their familiarity and their policy area of interest, and that organize their structure and sequence deliberation in different ways can be associated with differential effects on both option analysis and option selection stages of the policy process respectively.
0304-4130
135-152
Pogrebinschi, Thamy
9f0c924d-55d2-4302-8d0b-3093a88e51dc
Ryan, Matthew
f07cd3e8-f3d9-4681-9091-84c2df07cd54
Pogrebinschi, Thamy
9f0c924d-55d2-4302-8d0b-3093a88e51dc
Ryan, Matthew
f07cd3e8-f3d9-4681-9091-84c2df07cd54

Pogrebinschi, Thamy and Ryan, Matthew (2018) Moving beyond input legitimacy: When do democratic innovations affect policymaking? European Journal of Political Research, 57 (1), 135-152. (doi:10.1111/1475-6765.12219).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article makes three key contributions to debates surrounding the effectiveness of democratic innovation, deliberation, and participation in representative political systems. In the first instance we argue that more attention should be paid to the role that participation actually plays in governance. We show that the literature on democratic institutional design often neglects concern about the effects of innovative institutional designs on more traditional representative fora, at the expense of concerns about their internal procedures. Secondly we argue that despite limitations, replicable systematic comparison of the effects of institutional design is both necessary and possible even at the level of national governance. We present a comparative analysis of 31 cases of National Public Policy Conferences (NPPCs) in Brazil. Finally, we show that popular deliberative assemblies that vary in their familiarity and their policy area of interest, and that organize their structure and sequence deliberation in different ways can be associated with differential effects on both option analysis and option selection stages of the policy process respectively.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 June 2017
Published date: 1 February 2018
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 408701
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/408701
ISSN: 0304-4130
PURE UUID: e71b3348-02dd-4ac9-81a7-1c17cb551735

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jun 2017 04:01
Last modified: 01 Feb 2018 17:33

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Contributors

Author: Thamy Pogrebinschi
Author: Matthew Ryan

University divisions

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