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Developing electrolyte for a soluble lead redox flow battery by reprocessing spent lead acid battery electrodes

Developing electrolyte for a soluble lead redox flow battery by reprocessing spent lead acid battery electrodes
Developing electrolyte for a soluble lead redox flow battery by reprocessing spent lead acid battery electrodes
The archival value of this paper is the investigation of novel methods to recover lead (II) ions from spent lead acid battery electrodes to be used directly as electrolyte for a soluble lead flow battery. The methods involved heating electrodes of spent lead acid batteries in methanesulfonic acid and hydrogen peroxide to dissolve solid lead and lead dioxide out of the electrode material. The processes yielded lead methanesulfonate, which is an electrolyte for the soluble lead acid battery. The lead (II) ions in the electrolyte were identified using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy and their electrochemistry confirmed using cyclic voltammetry. The concentration of lead (II) ions was determined and it was found that using the higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide yielded the highest concentration of lead (II) ions. The method was therefore found to be sufficient to make electrolyte for a soluble lead cell
Lead recovery, electrolyte, soluble lead flow battery, energy storage
Orapeleng, Keletso
eec788a5-43c4-4cb0-9e71-5577612e8855
Wills, Richard
60b7c98f-eced-4b11-aad9-fd2484e26c2c
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab
Orapeleng, Keletso
eec788a5-43c4-4cb0-9e71-5577612e8855
Wills, Richard
60b7c98f-eced-4b11-aad9-fd2484e26c2c
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab

Orapeleng, Keletso, Wills, Richard and Cruden, Andrew (2017) Developing electrolyte for a soluble lead redox flow battery by reprocessing spent lead acid battery electrodes. Batteries, 3 (2). (doi:10.3390/batteries3020015).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The archival value of this paper is the investigation of novel methods to recover lead (II) ions from spent lead acid battery electrodes to be used directly as electrolyte for a soluble lead flow battery. The methods involved heating electrodes of spent lead acid batteries in methanesulfonic acid and hydrogen peroxide to dissolve solid lead and lead dioxide out of the electrode material. The processes yielded lead methanesulfonate, which is an electrolyte for the soluble lead acid battery. The lead (II) ions in the electrolyte were identified using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy and their electrochemistry confirmed using cyclic voltammetry. The concentration of lead (II) ions was determined and it was found that using the higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide yielded the highest concentration of lead (II) ions. The method was therefore found to be sufficient to make electrolyte for a soluble lead cell

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batteries-185998 (Accepted 27.04.2017) - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 May 2017
Published date: 3 May 2017
Keywords: Lead recovery, electrolyte, soluble lead flow battery, energy storage
Organisations: Energy Technology Group, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute, Education Hub

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410671
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410671
PURE UUID: d3e8fec0-f4f9-46d2-814b-09e5a39db072
ORCID for Richard Wills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4805-7589
ORCID for Andrew Cruden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3236-2535

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:20
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:19

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